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Moms secretly infiltrates online groups that promote the child's BLEACH “cure” them of autism

Two mothers infiltrate online groups where members claim that children with autism can be "cured" using toxic chemicals. Melissa Eaton, from Salisbury, North Carolina and Amanda Seigler, from Lake Worth, Florida, each having a child with autism, came across several groups – mainly on Facebook – claiming that chlorine dioxide, an industrial strength bleach, could treat the disease. To enter groups, Eaton and Seigler created false profiles and pretended to be parents of children with autism and looking for answers or treatments. Then they took screenshots of the posts, where parents suggest their children get their chemicals, NBC News reported. Next, Eaton, 39 and Seigler, 38, reported child abuse agencies locally. So far, they claim that they have reported at least 1 00 cases in the last three years. Melissa Eaton, 39 (left), Salisbury, North Carolina and Amanda Seigler, 38 (right), from Lake Worth, Florida, have infiltrated online groups for three years. The groups suggest feeding baby chlorine dioxide, an industrial strength bleach, can "cure" autism "Cure" became popular by former Chicago real estate agents Kerri Rivera (pictured), claiming to have reversed autism symptoms in more than 500 children [19659012] Eaton and Seigler told NBC News that some of the discoveries they found in these groups were scary. A mother from Kansas wrote in the Facebook group after feeding her baby chlorine dioxide: "My son is constantly making a rocking sound." Another mother from Canada wrote that her child had refused to drink the composition. He does not open his…

Two mothers infiltrate online groups where members claim that children with autism can be “cured” using toxic chemicals.

Melissa Eaton, from Salisbury, North Carolina and Amanda Seigler, from Lake Worth, Florida, each having a child with autism, came across several groups – mainly on Facebook – claiming that chlorine dioxide, an industrial strength bleach, could treat the disease.

To enter groups, Eaton and Seigler created false profiles and pretended to be parents of children with autism and looking for answers or treatments.

Then they took screenshots of the posts, where parents suggest their children get their chemicals, NBC News reported.

Next, Eaton, 39 and Seigler, 38, reported child abuse agencies locally. So far, they claim that they have reported at least 1

00 cases in the last three years.

 Melissa Eaton, 39 (pictured), Salisbury, North Carolina, and Amanda Seigler, 38, from Lake Worth, Florida, has infiltrated online groups for three years.

 The groups suggest that feeding of child chlorine dioxide, an industrial strength bleach, can "cure" autism. Formed: Seigler

Melissa Eaton, 39 (left), Salisbury, North Carolina and Amanda Seigler, 38 (right), from Lake Worth, Florida, have infiltrated online groups for three years. The groups suggest feeding baby chlorine dioxide, an industrial strength bleach, can “cure” autism

“Cure” became popular by former Chicago real estate agents Kerri Rivera (pictured), claiming to have reversed autism symptoms in more than 500 children [19659012] Eaton and Seigler told NBC News that some of the discoveries they found in these groups were scary.

A mother from Kansas wrote in the Facebook group after feeding her baby chlorine dioxide: “My son is constantly making a rocking sound.”

Another mother from Canada wrote that her child had refused to drink the composition. He does not open his mouth. He is yelling. Spits. Jumps over, “she wrote.

Eaton and Seigler said the groups were like a cult.

” It really weighs on you, but the kids are being abused, “Eaton told NBC News. & # 39; You see it. You have the choice to do something about it or let it go, and I am not the kind who can see such a thing and just forget it.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder where sufferers have difficulty communicating and with behavior

It includes several conditions – including autism, Asperger’s syndrome and childhood disorder – and the symptoms may range from mild to severe.

Children are usually diagnosed by age two after showing signs of impaired eye contact, not responding to their names and performs repetitive movements.

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in 59 children has ASD.

Researchers do not know what causes ASD, but believe that it is a combination of genes o

 Eaton (pictured) and Seigler, all of whom have autistic children, take screenshots posts and notify local childcare agencies for child abuse

Eaton (pictured) and Seigler, all of whom have autistic children, take screenshots of the posts and notify local child welfare for child abuse

 Poison Control Centers have warned that the chemical may irritate the eyes and skin, and even lead to buildup of fluid in the lungs. Formed: Seigler

Poison control centers have warned that the chemical can irritate the eyes and skin, and even lead to buildup of fluid in the lungs. Author: Seigler

Parents of several of these groups like Eaton and Seigler infiltrated think autism is caused by a variety of things, including viruses, bacteria, vaccines, parasites and even gluten.

The treatments they propose are bizarre, to say the least, and include turpentine and the child’s own urine.

But perhaps the most popular is chlorine dioxide, a chemical compound used in bleaching wood pulp and in disinfecting municipal drinking water.

Parents administer it orally or via enemas.

The idea of ​​chlorine dioxide promoted as a cure was first popular by Jim Humble, an ex-Scientologist.

However, it became popular by former Chicago real estate broker Kerri Rivera, who wrote about it in his 2013 book Healing Symptom Known as Autism.

Rivera, who does not have a medical degree, said she treated her own autistic son with chlorine dioxide and promoted it over social media.

According to NBC News, she claims to have cured more than 500 children of autism.

 Rivera's book has been banned by Amazon, her email account has been deleted by Yahoo and several of her YouTube videos have been deleted.

Rivera’s book has been banned by Amazon, her email account has been removed by Yahoo and several of her YouTube videos have been removed.

In a statement to the outlet, she wr ote: “This is a medical issue. I have a degree in homeopathy and work with researchers and researchers. & Nbsp;

Breathing in chlorine dioxide can irritate the eyes, skin and nose , according to the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services

Exposed in higher amounts can lead to buildup of fluid in the lungs, shortness of breath and jaundice or yellowing of the skin.

In one case, a six-year-old boy had his intestine removed and was equipped with a colostomy bag after repeatedly receiving these enemas, according to The Daily Mirror.

Over the past five years, more than 16,000 cases have been reported throughout the United States, data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers show.

2500 were autistic for children under the age of 12, although it can not be determined at all.

NBC News reported that 50 of these cases were considered life-threatening and eight resulted in death. [19659002] In March, Amazon Rivera’s book banned and YouTube took down several of her videos. Yahoo took away its email account and Facebook also closed several of its pages

Rivera told NBC News in an email that Amazon’s ban on their book would “reduce public awareness” of her message and that tech giant was “responding to media-generated hysteria.

Since then, Rivera has created new Facebook pages, seen by DailyMail.com before publishing. She did not respond to a request for comment.

Eaton and Seigler say they are still looking at her various social media platforms, looking for new pages and groups.

“Her profile must go and they must ban their IP address,” said Eaton NBC News.


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