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“Momo” can be “dead”, but experts say avoiding the next hoax is up to us

Ding dong, "Momo" is dead, but not if you ask Buzzfeed, or the legions of parents, police and trainers who still warn of the mythical online blunder. On March 6, Buzzfeed staff floated across New York City to issue copies of the site's first ever physical "newspaper," which chief editor Ben Smith characterized as "an attempt to make the internet on the desktop". And who better to mention the cover of the internet's first edition than Momo, the latest digital boogeyman (or in this case boogey bird woman) to get the fear of the hearts of children, their parents, their school district and even YouTube. "Help! I'm in love with Momo", read the cover. It is a direction of the newspaper feature story of how "Momo", the horrific disembodied faces behind the repeatedly debunked "suicide challenge" of the same name, has developed a legion of fans who now express their "love" for Momo through art. So how did we get here? How did this obviously hit, it was just the latest feed for internet membranes, which led to panic among parents in countries from India to Colombia, from Britain to the United States and from parliaments to US police agencies? CREEPY "MOMO SUICIDE CHALLENGE" HOAX RESURFACES: What you need to know As with all things Momo, the answer is not exactly clear. But a handful of psychologists who talked to Fox say this case should definitely inspire some soul-searching for caregivers who want to keep their children safe in the…

Ding dong, “Momo” is dead, but not if you ask Buzzfeed, or the legions of parents, police and trainers who still warn of the mythical online blunder.

On March 6, Buzzfeed staff floated across New York City to issue copies of the site’s first ever physical “newspaper,” which chief editor Ben Smith characterized as “an attempt to make the internet on the desktop”. And who better to mention the cover of the internet’s first edition than Momo, the latest digital boogeyman (or in this case boogey bird woman) to get the fear of the hearts of children, their parents, their school district and even YouTube.

“Help! I’m in love with Momo”, read the cover. It is a direction of the newspaper feature story of how “Momo”, the horrific disembodied faces behind the repeatedly debunked “suicide challenge” of the same name, has developed a legion of fans who now express their “love” for Momo through art.

So how did we get here? How did this obviously hit, it was just the latest feed for internet membranes, which led to panic among parents in countries from India to Colombia, from Britain to the United States and from parliaments to US police agencies?

CREEPY “MOMO SUICIDE CHALLENGE” HOAX RESURFACES: What you need to know

As with all things Momo, the answer is not exactly clear. But a handful of psychologists who talked to Fox say this case should definitely inspire some soul-searching for caregivers who want to keep their children safe in the digital age, and who prefers to avoid the next “Momo”, whatever form he / she wins [1

9659003] “MOMO IS DEAD”

One thing is sure of all this: “Momo” is not true, “Momo challenge” is not true, and at this time, there is little evidence that one of the stories suggesting Momo encourages the children to harm themselves (or worse) who is ever supported by any evidence.

If you need a quick primer on Momo trials and trials, look no further. Even when you understand what the Momo story was about, don’t expect to find a paper track that makes any sense.

Social media and news intelligence agency Storyful, a company that can track trolling and disinformation campaigns back to its sources, told Fox that most of what was found on “Momo” had to do with the story being a hoax.

RETURN OF MOMO SUICIDE CHALLENGE & # 39; SPARKS FEAR AMONG PARENTS

This week, to put some long-lasting fears to rest, a figure that was inadvertently in the middle of the “Momo” phenomenon took things a step further in the quest to kill this cyberspace spectrum .

Internet and social media Buzzfeed has printed a magazine, the special edition of the BuzzFeed magazine, which shows the latest news and BuzzFeed content. The cover story dealt with the explosion of fan art about the latest emergence of urban / internet horror legend, Momo, who has been debunked as a hoax several times.
(“Photo / Richard Drew”)

“The children can be assured Momo is dead,” said Japanese artist Keisuke Aiso The Sun. Aiso is a sculptor, and the now widely used “Momo” face used in these online “hoaxes” seems to have been stolen from Aiso’s 2016 work entitled “Mother Bird”.

Aiso said that while he had nothing to do with the spread of the “Momo Challenge”, he felt compelled to let children around the world know that “[Momo] does not exist and the curse is gone.”

MOMO is “FAKE NEWS” ]

Laura Hazard Owen, assistant editor of Harvard’s Nieman Journalism Lab, called the “Momo Challenge” phenomenon the most fascinating / unique fake news story I have took a while. “The problem was she most of the news stories that warned people if” Momo “seemed to be based on hearsay. A local news station she pointed to,” interviewed only a 5-year-old while others ran with anecdotes from parents who had heard from their child that they had heard from another child … you get the score.

SINISTER & MOMO SUICIDE CHALLENGE SPA RKS FEAR AS IT SPREADS ON WHATSAPP Adding fuel to the fire were warnings from school districts and law enforcement agencies that likewise spread the idea that Momo could be a real danger for parents to be wary of not mentioning that there was very little evidence to support any of these problems.

Fox saw a warning letter from a school district outside New York City that warned of the “disturbing trend on social media and internet platforms that some of your children may have experienced or heard about. “It did not mention that the warning was not based on any specific incidents, even though the district pointed out that” Whole adults can often easily navigate such disturbances, it is difficult for children to do so without supervision and / or guidance. “

Such ambiguous alarm clocks may have helped to sleep more fear of the fictional” Momo Challenge, “according to Dr. Pamela Rutledge, director of the Media Psychology Research Center.” People respond to what is called social proof, an innate cognitive bias that signals that something is important and valuable if many people pay attention to it, “Rutledge told Fox.” This type of behavior makes a lot of sense from an evolutionary perspective, but causes us to get many wrong signals from social media, “she added. , especially when adding the element of perceived danger or a threat. “

” All our brains are very sensitive to danger and threat, “she said, especially to” parents who have both a psychological and biological need to protect their children and the slope to protect other innocent as well. “

Although it is good to be vigilant about the dangers around you, too much exposure can actually have a detrimental effect. And this applies to both children and parents.

FACEBOOK FRIEND REQUEST HOAX GOES VIRAL: DO NOT FALL FOR THESE MESSAGES

“It can be dangerous that children are exposed to such scary ideas [as the Momo challenge] and can stay with them for a period of time, challenge their feelings of security, “says dr. Nancy Mramor, a psychologist and award-winning author on the media’s impact. “This phenomenon occurs in adults who see too many crimes – they feel less secure than those who don’t,” she explained to Fox.

In this case, the warnings from concerned parents and school districts can only have increased hysteria surrounding this false boogeyman / woman.

“We wanted to touch the base with everyone to make you aware of a disturbing trend that has evolved on social media and internet platforms that some of your children may have experienced or heard about.”

– Email to parents in a US school district warning about Momo

Dr. Dawn Branley-Bell, a health, social and cyber psychologist at Northumbria University in the UK, specializing in the psychology of social media, told Fox that “The Momo Challenge” may have been a great mockery, “no doubt, this challenge upset many people – especially parents!

FAKE NEWS SPREADS FASTER ON TWITTER THAN REAL NEWS, STUDY SAYS

“It is important that the media do not engage in scaremongering and that parents recognize online accommodates what they are – and sends this knowledge to their children, “Dr. Branley-Bell explained.” Unfortunately, for many parents, these challenges make it so alarming that they create panic and that only makes the situation worse, especially when it is further exacerbated by sensational media headlines, she says.

HOW TO IMPROVE NEXT MOMO

says Dr. Branley-Bell to prevent the next “Momo” style of Internet horror from being even easier than putting pairs of speech blocks on all your children’s apps. “I suggest that parents still try to put the physical protection measures in place as they can (blocking adult content, accompanying social media age limits, etc.), but also encouraging their children to be open with them to discuss what they are doing online,” she said.

While parents may not understand everything their children do on the internet these days, or why “caremongering and acting negatively if the internet is generally likely to just make sure your kids keep their online world hidden from you” “Dr Branley-Bell said. “Of course, you will not be subject to everything that happens in life, but trying to maintain a supportive relationship is a good step in the right direction,” she added.

Dr. Mramor’s advice on preventing the spread of the next internet jump is something that is important if you are a parent who is worried about Momo.

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“If not You can watch all the media, TV and news, deliberately, go back from it, take a little distance and ask yourself what said, you will be taken in, “said Mramor. “It’s like watching a scary movie and sucking into the plot … being a conscious consumer,” she said. “And if more people were to, it would never happen. We wouldn’t even talk about this story.”

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