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MIT can shrink 3D objects down to nanoscale versions

December 17, 2018 Science 0 Views The scientist's approach begins by creating a polyacrylate scaffold, an absorbent material found in diapers. They then suck the structure into a solution of fluorescein molecules that attach to the position when subjected to light – creators can use lasers to place the most particle wherever they want, whether it's genetic material or metal nanoparticles. To shrink the structure down after that point, the layer introduces an acid that blocks negative charges in polyacrylate and forces it to shrink. There are limits to existing technology. The resolution of the final product is correlated directly with its size. An object of 1 cubic meter can have a resolution of 50 nanometers, but you must blow it up to 1 cubic centimeter to achieve a resolution of 500 nanometers. However, the potential is great. The researchers suspect that this could initially be used to create specialized science, microscopy and even smartphone technology, but it can be extremely useful for nanostorlek in robots. The biggest challenge at this point is scale. While the necessary equipment is readily available in laboratories, it may be another thing to completely mass-produce nanoscale parts. Source link

The scientist’s approach begins by creating a polyacrylate scaffold, an absorbent material found in diapers. They then suck the structure into a solution of fluorescein molecules that attach to the position when subjected to light – creators can use lasers to place the most particle wherever they want, whether it’s genetic material or metal nanoparticles. To shrink the structure down after that point, the layer introduces an acid that blocks negative charges in polyacrylate and forces it to shrink.

There are limits to existing technology. The resolution of the final product is correlated directly with its size. An object of 1

cubic meter can have a resolution of 50 nanometers, but you must blow it up to 1 cubic centimeter to achieve a resolution of 500 nanometers.

However, the potential is great. The researchers suspect that this could initially be used to create specialized science, microscopy and even smartphone technology, but it can be extremely useful for nanostorlek in robots. The biggest challenge at this point is scale. While the necessary equipment is readily available in laboratories, it may be another thing to completely mass-produce nanoscale parts.


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