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McKinsey held a company's retreat miles from Chinese detention camps

McKinsey & Company had an unnecessary business home in Kashgar, about four miles from where thousands of Muslim Chinese are locked up in a detention camp, the New York Times reported on Saturday. The retreat emphasized McKinsey's work with China, as consultants enjoyed bras, camels and red carpets. This anecdote speaks of a worrying trend on McKinsey – engages in the work of authoritarian leaders around the world, even as the consultant tells us to "make a positive difference". Up to one million Chinese citizens have been identified unlocked in the western part of Xinjiang – a remote, Muslim majority of Chinese province populated by the ethnic minority in Uighur. Reports from a massive police state launched by China in Xinjiang have scared people around the world, demanding that China cease monitoring, imprisonment and compulsory education of Chinese Muslims. The United Nations has demanded that China release the captive citizens. However, the people at McKinsey & Company's latest retreat in Kashgar, a Xinjiang city, did not seem to think. A report from The New York Times revealed on Saturday that McKinsey held a corporate retreat in Kashgar about four miles from a detention camp that houses thousands of Uighurs. A police officer checks a Uighur man's ID document in Kashgar, Xinjiang, in March 2017. Thomas Peter / Reuters Anecdote speaks of a major trend on McKinsey, New York Times reporters Walt Bogdanich and Michael Forsythe wrote: At a time when democracies and their fundamental values ​​are increasingly being attacked, the…

  • McKinsey & Company had an unnecessary business home in Kashgar, about four miles from where thousands of Muslim Chinese are locked up in a detention camp, the New York Times reported on Saturday.
  • The retreat emphasized McKinsey’s work with China, as consultants enjoyed bras, camels and red carpets.
  • This anecdote speaks of a worrying trend on McKinsey – engages in the work of authoritarian leaders around the world, even as the consultant tells us to “make a positive difference”.

Up to one million Chinese citizens have been identified unlocked in the western part of Xinjiang – a remote, Muslim majority of Chinese province populated by the ethnic minority in Uighur.

Reports from a massive police state launched by China in Xinjiang have scared people around the world, demanding that China cease monitoring, imprisonment and compulsory education of Chinese Muslims. The United Nations has demanded that China release the captive citizens.

However, the people at McKinsey & Company’s latest retreat in Kashgar, a Xinjiang city, did not seem to think. A report from The New York Times revealed on Saturday that McKinsey held a corporate retreat in Kashgar about four miles from a detention camp that houses thousands of Uighurs.

A police officer checks a Uighur man’s ID document in Kashgar, Xinjiang, in March 2017. Thomas Peter / Reuters

Anecdote speaks of a major trend on McKinsey, New York Times reporters Walt Bogdanich and Michael Forsythe wrote:

At a time when democracies and their fundamental values ​​are increasingly being attacked, the iconic American company has helped raise the size of state and corrupt governments worldwide, sometimes in ways like against American interests.

At the Kashgar retreat, McKinsey consultants spent their time discussing their work with state-owned Chinese companies, as well as driving camels and going to superfluous fires, the Times reported. They spent their time in tents in the Kashgar desert that were linked by red carpets. And the consultants documented the “Disney-like” experience at Instagram, according to The New York Times.

The decision to do business with state-owned companies and hold a luxury retreat four miles from a detention camp that strengthens Islamophobic policy by the Chinese government is in contrast to what McKinsey claims is its mission and purpose in the world. The other “value” stated on the site is “comply with high ethical standards.”

The Times report also describes McKinseyes business deals with authoritarian figures in Ukraine, Russia, Saudi Arabia and Malaysia.

“Since 1926, McKinsey has tried to make a positive difference to the companies and communities in which our people live and work,” the company said in a statement to the Times.

“Like many other big companies, including our competitors, we try to navigate in a changed geopolitical environment, but we do not support or engage in political activities,” added the company.

Read the entire New York Times report about McKinsey here.

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