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Man inadvertently proves that hipsters look the same by failing like himself: NPR

This is the preferred version of a disputed photo from a MIT Technology Review article on hipsters. Original text: "Shot of a handsome young man in fashionable winter dress against a wooden background." PeopleImages / Getty Images hide caption change caption PeopleImages / Getty Images This is the preferred version of a disputed photo from a MIT Technology Review article on hipsters. Original text: "Shot of a handsome young man in fashionable winter dress against a wooden background." PeopleImages / Getty Images It's a running joke that male hipsters all resemble their flannel shirts, thick beards and other apparently off-fire attributes. But a comic event at MIT Technology Review can only prove that they all really look the same. The publication recently published an article on a study by Brandeis University on the "hipster effect" that studied how nonconformists usually act unconventionally in the same way – to become exactly the same. "What the study showed was essentially that when a group of people decide to be different, to do something that doesn't match, it comes to a point when they all stop adopting the same behavior or style," said Gideon Lichfield, editor-in-chief. for MIT Technology Review, to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro for Weekend Edition ]. Although the study itself proves this theory, it inadvertently thinks the edited photo on top of the story – which contained a man in a plaid shirt with a cap on – is by yourself, a friend's hipster. 19659008] Shortly after the article was published,…

This is the preferred version of a disputed photo from a MIT Technology Review article on hipsters. Original text: “Shot of a handsome young man in fashionable winter dress against a wooden background.”

PeopleImages / Getty Images

hide caption

change caption

PeopleImages / Getty Images

This is the preferred version of a disputed photo from a MIT Technology Review article on hipsters. Original text: “Shot of a handsome young man in fashionable winter dress against a wooden background.”

PeopleImages / Getty Images

It’s a running joke that male hipsters all resemble their flannel shirts, thick beards and other apparently off-fire attributes. But a comic event at MIT Technology Review can only prove that they all really look the same.

The publication recently published an article on a study by Brandeis University on the “hipster effect” that studied how nonconformists usually act unconventionally in the same way – to become exactly the same.

“What the study showed was essentially that when a group of people decide to be different, to do something that doesn’t match, it comes to a point when they all stop adopting the same behavior or style,” said Gideon Lichfield, editor-in-chief. for MIT Technology Review, to NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro for Weekend Edition ].

Although the study itself proves this theory, it inadvertently thinks the edited photo on top of the story – which contained a man in a plaid shirt with a cap on – is by yourself, a friend’s hipster. 19659008] Shortly after the article was published, MIT Technology Review immediately received an email from someone who claimed he was the man in the picture and had not given his consent. He accused the publication of telling him and threatening legal acts and wrote:

“You used a heavily edited Getty image of me For your latest piece of behavior about why hipsters are all like it. It is a badly written and insulting article and somewhat ironic about five years too late to be as desperately relevant as it is trying to be. By using a tired cattle to try to spruce up a different study. Your lack of basic journalistic ethics and both the way in which you reported this unredited nonsense and the reprehensible unnecessary use of my unauthorized image requires a response and I obviously follow legal action. “

Lichfield and his team quickly checked to see if the model in the photo signed a model release. They contacted Getty Images, who found that the person who signed the model release was not the one who wrote the anger email.

After the misunderstanding the man replied by saying to Getty Images “Wow, I am corrected I suppose I and several family members, and a childhood friend, pointed it out to me, thought it was a mildly photographed picture of me. I also have a very similar hat and shirt, but in full color I can see that it is not the same. Thank you for coming back to me and solving the problem. “

Lichfield tweeted this scenario and wrote that the event” only proves the story we ran: Hipster looks so much that they can’t even tell each other. “

Lindsey Feingold is NPR Digital Content internal. NPR’s Dana Cronin and Barrie Hardymon produced and edited this story for broadcast.

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