Categories: world

Madagascar fighting killer outbreaks

A measles patient sitting on a bed at a health clinic in Fort Dauphin, Madagascar on February 28, 2019. Rasoanaivo Clarel Faniry, Ruters ANTSIRANANA, Madagascar – Frangeline is 2 years old, but does not weigh more than a 4 months old – the terrible result of her fight against measles, which cuts a deadly float through Madagascar. Widespread malnutrition and low levels of immunization on the Indian Ocean have accelerated the mortality of the highly infectious virus. Over the past 6 months, nearly 1 ,000 children have been killed by a recurrent disease that the vaccination once seemed to have tamat. After a drop, the scraping infant was only saved because her mother Soa Robertine, 32, made the 25-kilometer trek from her home to the Anivorano-North health center in the northern part of the island. Without her early action, respiratory or neurological complications resulting from the virus would have proved fatal, the doctors said. [19659003] "Frangeline suffers serious malnutrition and she was not vaccinated" against measles, "says the clinic's medical director, Hollande Robisoa. " She drew a complicated form of measles and she would have died if she did not Many others children have not been so happy. Between September and February, there were more than 79,000 cases of measles in Madagascar, of which 926 were mortal according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The Anivorano North Clinic has had 510 patients suffering from "kitrotro" and "kisaosy" – the local names of measles. About 100 patients were hospitalized, but only…

A measles patient sitting on a bed at a health clinic in Fort Dauphin, Madagascar on February 28, 2019. Rasoanaivo Clarel Faniry, Ruters

ANTSIRANANA, Madagascar – Frangeline is 2 years old, but does not weigh more than a 4 months old – the terrible result of her fight against measles, which cuts a deadly float through Madagascar.

Widespread malnutrition and low levels of immunization on the Indian Ocean have accelerated the mortality of the highly infectious virus.

Over the past 6 months, nearly 1

,000 children have been killed by a recurrent disease that the vaccination once seemed to have tamat.

After a drop, the scraping infant was only saved because her mother Soa Robertine, 32, made the 25-kilometer trek from her home to the Anivorano-North health center in the northern part of the island.

Without her early action, respiratory or neurological complications resulting from the virus would have proved fatal, the doctors said. [19659003] “Frangeline suffers serious malnutrition and she was not vaccinated” against measles, “says the clinic’s medical director, Hollande Robisoa.

” She drew a complicated form of measles and she would have died if she did not

Many others children have not been so happy.

Between September and February, there were more than 79,000 cases of measles in Madagascar, of which 926 were mortal according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

The Anivorano North Clinic has had 510 patients suffering from “kitrotro” and “kisaosy” – the local names of measles.

About 100 patients were hospitalized, but only 4 lost their lives according to official

“I heard that hundreds of children have already died,” said Sylvain Randriamaro, 46, who is in the hospital room.

But many locals force the numbers into a society where rumors are common. ] “I was worried, so I decided to be my two children,” aged five and six, he said.

Measles has beaten Madagascar just under a year after it was arrested by an outbreak of plague requiring 200 lives.

“It’s a major epidemic,” said Dr. Vincent Sodjinou, a WHO representative.

“It is under the fact that the number of vaccine protection was not high enough for almost a decade, and for generations the number of unvaccinated people has increased.”

“MALNUTRITION A BED FOR MEASLES”

Masks may be relatively benign if symptoms such as fever and cough are handled immediately.

If there is no risk of “opportunistic” disease such as pneumonia or diarrhea – diseases that can fatally attack patients with weak immune systems.

In Madagascar, where 47 percent of children under 5 are malnourished, the disease has been shown to be particularly dangerous.

“It is often said that malnutrition makes a bed of measles,” Sodjinou said. “The most serious cases are often reported in malnourished children.”

The children’s hospital at Antsiranana military hospital, north of Anivorano, has been overwhelmed.

“Normally, we treat only one measles case here every two months” medical director Ravohavy Setriny Mahatsangy. “We’ve had 444 just since December.”

Mahatsangy blamed physical contact between patients, their “reluctance to go to hospital and resistance to vaccinations”.

The combination of factors has made a tragic toll on their patients.

One example is Marie Lydia Zafisoa, aged eight, whose mother took her to a witch doctor … and then a traditional doctor who arranged six baths, “said her aunt Bana Tombo.

When it failed, Zafisoa’s The father carried her to the clinic.

“It was too late – she died on the road, on her father’s shoulders,” said Tombo.

The seven-month-old Adriano Luc Rakototsioharana was more happy.

Her grandmother Catherine also had turned to traditional medicine before she took her to hospital.

She hardly survived the test – but still Catherine continues that traditional medicine holds the key.

“For measles you need a cow dirt infusion or a tea with bark from the lazalaza tree,” sh

“IT IS CULTURE”

Doctors say such beliefs are frustrating for their efforts to tear the disease back.

“It’s the culture,” Ravohavy says, m. ed departure le.

“Changing people’s mentality is much more difficult than treating measles.”

The profession also regrets that the situation worsens even though the state pays for most measles treatment.

“But the people prefer traditional doctors who often advised them to reject hospitalization,” said a health department official, Dr. Said Borohany.

“And most villages are hours from basic medical centers.”

The second soluble solution, vaccinations, has become complicated by lack of funds available for such a program.

So far, the nation’s vaccination program has administered a single dose when WHO recommends 2.

The United Nations agency estimates that 5.6 million doses would be needed to contain the epidemic. 1965900 3] But Madagascar is $ 1.6 million (EUR 1.42 million), except the $ 11.2 million needed to fund such an operation.

Newly elected president Andry Rajoelina has promised to vaccinate all children between six and nine years.

“Our goal is to eradicate measles,” he said.

But the fight will be long and difficult.

“Madagascar introduced a routine vaccination program,” said the WHO envoy, Sodjinou. “But it is still insufficient to reach the longest stretches of the country.”

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