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Look at these incredible dinosaur footprints found in England

Two large iguanodontic footprints with skin and clover pressure. Image: Neil Davies A credible well-preserved dinosaur footprint has been discovered on a beach in southern England. Paleontologists from the University of Cambridge have discovered 85 dinosaur footprints from at least seven different species on a beach in East Sussex near Hastings, England. . It is now considered to be "the most versatile and detailed collection of these trace fossils from the chalk era so far in Britain," according to a statement. Prints vary in size from about a quarter of inches (2 cm) to almost 24 inches (60 cm) above. The researchers, led by Anthony Shillito, PhD student at the Cambridges Department of Geosciences, could identify some of the dinosaurs responsible for the prints, including an Iguanodon an Ankylosaurus a species of stegosaurus and some unidentified sauropodes (long-legged, spring-borne herbivores). The level of detail in some of these pressures is really remarkable. A print to the left of any kind of teropod-a two-legged carnivore. Image: Neil Davies The discovery of these footsteps became possible due to coastal erosion. Over the last four winters, strong storms and storms have hit the coast and caused the sandstone and mudstone cliffs within which these pressures were embedded to collapse and expose them. The stratigraphic layers date back to the Lower Cretaceous period, between 145 million and 100 million years ago. Details of this extraordinary result were published this week in the science journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. A close-up of skin impressions from an…

Two large iguanodontic footprints with skin and clover pressure. Image: Neil Davies

A credible well-preserved dinosaur footprint has been discovered on a beach in southern England. Paleontologists from the University of Cambridge have discovered 85 dinosaur footprints from at least seven different species on a beach in East Sussex near Hastings, England. . It is now considered to be “the most versatile and detailed collection of these trace fossils from the chalk era so far in Britain,” according to a statement.

Prints vary in size from about a quarter of inches (2 cm) to almost 24 inches (60 cm) above. The researchers, led by Anthony Shillito, PhD student at the Cambridges Department of Geosciences, could identify some of the dinosaurs responsible for the prints, including an Iguanodon an Ankylosaurus a species of stegosaurus and some unidentified sauropodes (long-legged, spring-borne herbivores). The level of detail in some of these pressures is really remarkable.

A print to the left of any kind of teropod-a two-legged carnivore. Image: Neil Davies

The discovery of these footsteps became possible due to coastal erosion. Over the last four winters, strong storms and storms have hit the coast and caused the sandstone and mudstone cliffs within which these pressures were embedded to collapse and expose them.

The stratigraphic layers date back to the Lower Cretaceous period, between 145 million and 100 million years ago. Details of this extraordinary result were published this week in the science journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology.

A close-up of skin impressions from an iguanodontic footprint. Image: Neil Davie

This region in southern England is known for producing dinosaur fossils, including the first example of fossilized brain tissue found in 2016. However, in the last century, the area has only resulted in the odd DINO- footprint, and certainly nothing on this scale. Dinosaur footprints are of great value for researchers and offer insights that body fossils can not, such as evidence of soft tissue, behavior and a sense of which animals and plants that lived in the same place at the same time.

Ankylosaur footprint Image: Neil Davies

The area where these particular dinosaurs roamed were probably near a water source, according to the researchers. The site also featured traces of fossil plants and invertebrates.

“In order to preserve footprints you need the right environment,” says study writer Neil Davies in a statement. “The ground must be” sticky “enough so that the footprint leaves a mark but not so wet that it is washed away. You need that balance to capture and retain them.”

To which Shillito added: In addition to the great overflow and diversity of these prints, we also see incredible detail. You can clearly see the texture of the skin and the wave, as well as square clumps, which are extremely rare. You can get an idea of ​​which dinosaurs made them from the shape of the footsteps – compare them with what we know about dinosaurs from other fossils, you can identify important similarities. When looking at footprints from other places, you can start controlling which species were key actors. “

The Cambridgesian Pathologists are trying to find out if these dinosaurs can have changed the rivers of rivers. Today, large mammals, like hippos and cows, create small channels that are known to divert the flow of the river. Dinosaurs, with their huge size, may have caused similar processes. Researchers have struggled to find evidence of this in the dino era, but these newly discovered footsteps show hints of this process at work, such as deep footprints where plants plants grow and print along the river banks’ beaches. But more research will be needed to offer this as evidence of dinosaurs that derive water channels.

A view of the rocks where the footsteps were discovered. Image: Neil Davies

This may be the end of paleontological explorations along this particular task. Erosion has been so bad along this East Sussex beach that civil servants have designed sea protection to slow or prevent coastal erosion processes. As a result, more clues left by ancient beings will remain hidden in the rocks – at least for the moment.

[Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology]
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