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LaCroix maker's CEO blames poor performance on 'injustice'

One of the most important lessons in leadership is that you must take ownership of your failures. When leaders take responsibility for their missteps, they sometimes even gain more respect and loyalty from their followers. [Div] group> p: first-child "/> That's a lesson that Nick Caporella, CEO of National Beverage Corporation, the maker of the popular seal water LaCroix, has yet to understand. According to a statement (strangely titled "We Just Love Our LaCroix Consumers Chant") released on Thursday, National Beverage Corp. Profits dropped by more than 39 percent in the last quarter. Caporella's response to LaCroix's poor performance was that it wasn't due to "mismanagement" or "woeful acts of God." Nope. LaCroix's decline in sales and profits was due to "injustice," he said. "Managing a brand is not so different from caring for someone who becomes handicapped," Caporella continued. "Brands do not see or hear, so they are at the mercy of their owners or care providers who must preserve the dignity and special character that the brand exemplifies." He might just win the award for worst CEO statement of 201 9.

One of the most important lessons in leadership is that you must take ownership of your failures. When leaders take responsibility for their missteps, they sometimes even gain more respect and loyalty from their followers. [Div] group> p: first-child “/>

That’s a lesson that Nick Caporella, CEO of National Beverage Corporation, the maker of the popular seal water LaCroix, has yet to understand. According to a statement (strangely titled “We Just Love Our LaCroix Consumers Chant”) released on Thursday, National Beverage Corp. Profits dropped by more than 39 percent in the last quarter.

Caporella’s response to LaCroix’s poor performance was that it wasn’t due to “mismanagement” or “woeful acts of God.” Nope. LaCroix’s decline in sales and profits was due to “injustice,” he said.

“Managing a brand is not so different from caring for someone who becomes handicapped,” Caporella continued. “Brands do not see or hear, so they are at the mercy of their owners or care providers who must preserve the dignity and special character that the brand exemplifies.” He might just win the award for worst CEO statement of 201

9.

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