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Kitsap mom whose son has AFM fighting for CDC to do more to track it

Please enable JavaScript to view this video SILVERDALE, Wash. – Acute spotting myelitis (AFM) may cause sudden paralysis. There have…

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SILVERDALE, Wash. – Acute spotting myelitis (AFM) may cause sudden paralysis. There have been hundreds of children in our country and continue to rise.

Doctors have no idea what causes it.

A Kitsap County mother who has helped her son to fight the disease for four years hopes that the federal medical authorities will start

Hayden Werdal is 1

7 but he became AFM when he was 13.

“It does to realize that it was so random and there was no opportunity to ever prepare for this. ” His mother Heather told Q13 at Silverdale’s Harrison Medical Center.

It started four years ago with a cold.

Photo is used with permission.

“It was a nasty cold, he was sick,” she said. “I held him home for a few days – we did not want him to spread the cold. When he got better, it could never happen to me anything else.”

She says that doctors did not initially know what to do and the centers for disease control and preventive measures would do more to study the condition. [19659003] “Those of us who have been in the dungeon for four years ask what have you done in the last four years?” She said.

In Washington, the Ministry of Health examines at least six possible cases. The signs can break and look like polio facial or weakness, difficulty in moving eyes, hanging eyelids and difficulty swallowing or slumbering speech.

The conditions affect the nervous system and so far the cause of individual cases can either be difficult to determine or sometimes there is no cause.

But Werdal says some doctors still do not know to suspect AFM so she wants the CDC to do more to track the disease.

“The only way you can say” This is what our children have “is of MR, so we’ll start,” she said.

Local health officials said they saw a nail in AFM two years ago. And today, the reasons are as mysterious.

If a doctor had suspected AFM earlier in Haye’s case, his mother considers that his future may have become brighter. Now she hopes the feds will take a closer look at the condition that forced her son to live the rest of her life in a wheelchair.

“I do not say we could have prevented the cases but we could have been able to treat our children faster so they would have had less deficits,” she said.

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