Categories: world

Kansas doctor sentenced to life in prison for patient death

Breaking News Emails Get urgent news alerts and special reports. The news and the stories that play a role, delivered everyday mornings. SUBSCRIBE March 9, 2019, 01:04 GMT Av Associated Press WICHITA, Kan. – A Kansas doctor sentenced to life in prison Friday for illegally prescribing medication blamed for an overdose of death, the latest indictment in a governmental influence on doctors in connection with an opioid epidemic. Steven R. Henson, 57, immediately took prison after sentencing. There was an audible gasp in the packed courtroom when the US district director J. Thomas Marten stated the longevity. Henson showed no feeling. A federal jury condemned the Wichita doctor for Nick McGovern's death in 2015. Prosecutors alleged McGovern, who received Henson's prescription, died of an overdose of the anti-anxiety drug alprazolam and methadone, used to renounce heroin abuse. The government presented evidence that Henson wrote prescriptions as opposed to money, post-dated recipes and wrote them without medical need or legitimate medical examination. Prosecutors said the doctor prescribed opioid drugs in amounts that could lead to abuse. This 2016 booking photo was released by Sedgwick County, Kan., Prison shows Steven R. Henson. Sedgwick County Prison via AP File He was also convicted of conspiracy to distribute prescription drugs outside of medical practice, illegally distributing various prescription drugs, presenting fake patient records for investigators, obstruction of justice and money laundering. His case is the latest in a series of prosecutions over the country's targeted physicians accused of over-performing opioids. "I want this case…

Breaking News Emails

Get urgent news alerts and special reports. The news and the stories that play a role, delivered everyday mornings.

Av Associated Press

WICHITA, Kan. – A Kansas doctor sentenced to life in prison Friday for illegally prescribing medication blamed for an overdose of death, the latest indictment in a governmental influence on doctors in connection with an opioid epidemic.

Steven R. Henson, 57, immediately took prison after sentencing. There was an audible gasp in the packed courtroom when the US district director J. Thomas Marten stated the longevity. Henson showed no feeling.

A federal jury condemned the Wichita doctor for Nick McGovern’s death in 2015. Prosecutors alleged McGovern, who received Henson’s prescription, died of an overdose of the anti-anxiety drug alprazolam and methadone, used to renounce heroin abuse.

The government presented evidence that Henson wrote prescriptions as opposed to money, post-dated recipes and wrote them without medical need or legitimate medical examination. Prosecutors said the doctor prescribed opioid drugs in amounts that could lead to abuse.

This 2016 booking photo was released by Sedgwick County, Kan., Prison shows Steven R. Henson. Sedgwick County Prison via AP File

He was also convicted of conspiracy to distribute prescription drugs outside of medical practice, illegally distributing various prescription drugs, presenting fake patient records for investigators, obstruction of justice and money laundering.

His case is the latest in a series of prosecutions over the country’s targeted physicians accused of over-performing opioids.

“I want this case to send a message to the doctor and the healthcare community,” US lawyer Stephen McAllister said in a press release. “Illegal distribution of opioids and other controlled substances is a federal crime.”

The General Bar Association, who worked with a research grant, found that there had been 378 doctors who had been charged or whose goals were resolved at the end of 2016. Of these, accused US law firms 249 and government agencies charged 131, the researchers found.

Defense Attorney Michael Thompson said his client was disappointed in the sentence and planned to appeal.

“When he served as a doctor His actions had urged the court to introduce the lowest possible sentence and claimed that McGovern had taken much more pills than prescribed on the day he died and had taken other drugs which were not prescribed. They claimed that Henson did not write a recipe that would have resulted in death if it was taken as directed.

In a short legal situation, Henson stated that he had trained hard to become a doctor.

“I only had one goal in life as a doctor and that is taking excellent care of the patients and increasing the functionality, “he said.

But the judge was unharmed by that statement and told Henson that he put the patient in a position where he had to take these pills in order to get through the day.

“You aggravated a problem, you didn’t treat it,” Marten said.

Several tearful members of McGovern’s family spoke in court about the consequences death has had on they court the family deserves to see justice served so this example will never happen to another family.

Some 47,600 Americans died of opioid overdoses in 2017, according to the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Opioid deaths were 13 percent higher than in 2016, an increase over almost 500 percent death rate overdose since 1999. Street drug fentanyl is the best overdose death now, heroin shift and analgesic pills. Prescription painkillers contributed to 14,495 deaths in 2017.

Share
Published by
Faela