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Just discovered! “Farout”, the longest object ever seen in the solar system

Astronomers have discovered a distant body that is more than 100 times longer from the sun than the Earth. Its preliminary term is 2018 VG18, but they have the nickname planet Farout. Farout is the distant body ever observed in our solar system, at 120 astronomical units (AU) away. The lesser planet center of the International Astronomical Union announced the discovery of Farout on Monday, December 17, 2018. This newly discovered object is the result of a search by astronomers search for the elusive "Planet X" or "Planet 9", a ninth largest planet believed to exist at the longest stretches of our solar system, where its mass would form the circulation of remote planets like Farout. The team has not determined the 201 8 VG18 track, so they do not know if its path shows signs of influence from Planet X. An astronomer's trio made the discovery: Carnegie Science Institute Scott S. Sheppard, University of Hawaii David Tholen and Northern Arizona University Chad Trujillo. Members of the same team also discovered "The Goblin" in October 2018. Goblin is another distant world whose orbit is believed to be shaped by the elusive Planet 9. "2018 VG18 is far more distant and slower than any other observed Solar System object , so it takes a few years to completely determine its orbit. "- Scott Sheppard, Carnegie Science Institute. "2018 VG18 is far more distant and slower than any other observed Solar System object, so it takes a few years to fully determine…

Astronomers have discovered a distant body that is more than 100 times longer from the sun than the Earth. Its preliminary term is 2018 VG18, but they have the nickname planet Farout. Farout is the distant body ever observed in our solar system, at 120 astronomical units (AU) away.

The lesser planet center of the International Astronomical Union announced the discovery of Farout on Monday, December 17, 2018. This newly discovered object is the result of a search by astronomers search for the elusive “Planet X” or “Planet 9”, a ninth largest planet believed to exist at the longest stretches of our solar system, where its mass would form the circulation of remote planets like Farout. The team has not determined the 201

8 VG18 track, so they do not know if its path shows signs of influence from Planet X.

An astronomer’s trio made the discovery: Carnegie Science Institute Scott S. Sheppard, University of Hawaii David Tholen and Northern Arizona University Chad Trujillo. Members of the same team also discovered “The Goblin” in October 2018. Goblin is another distant world whose orbit is believed to be shaped by the elusive Planet 9.

“2018 VG18 is far more distant and slower than any other observed Solar System object , so it takes a few years to completely determine its orbit. “- Scott Sheppard, Carnegie Science Institute.

“2018 VG18 is far more distant and slower than any other observed Solar System object, so it takes a few years to fully determine its orbit,” Sheppard said. “But it was found in a similar spot in the sky to the other known extreme Solar System objects, suggesting that it may have the same kind of path as most of them do. The orbital similarities shown by many of the known small, remote The solar system bodies were the catalyst for our original claim that there is a distant massive planet of hundreds of AU that hires these smaller objects. “

Farout was discovered with the Magellan telescope at the Carnegie Las Campana observatory in Chile and with the Japanese Subaru 8 meter telescope located on top of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Subaru was the first to discover it on the night of November 10, 2018.

 Discovery Images of 2018 VG18 Discovery Images of 2018 VG18 “Farout” from Subaru Telescope November 10, 2018. Farout Moves Between The Two Detected Images While The background stars and galaxies do not move over 1 hour between the pictures. Credit: Scott S. Sheppard / David Tholen.

In early December, the Magellan telescope 2018 discovered VG18 for the second time. The astronomers used Magellan for a week to confirm the planet’s way across the sky and to get its basic physical properties, such as brightness and color. Observations made with the Magellan telescope confirmed the distance 120 AU. They also suggest that the planet is approximately spherical and is approximately 500 km in diameter. The new planet has a pink shade that is a color associated with ice-cream objects.

“Everything we currently know about the 2018 VG18 is its extreme distance from the sun, its approximate diameter and its color,” added Tholen. “Because the 2018 VG18 is so distant, it cycles very slowly, it probably takes more than 1000 years to take a trip around the sun. “

Astronomers move farther into space in their search for objects at the limits of our Solar System. What was once considered a big, cold emptiness is now known to be home to several objects. And with better telescopes, computers and research methods, astronomers can find more and more bodies in our distant stretches.

“This discovery is truly an international achievement in research on telescopes in Hawaii and Chile, run by Japan, as well as a consortium of research institutes and universities in the United States,” concluded Trujillo. “With new widescreen digital cameras on some of the world’s largest telescopes, we finally explore our solar system’s fringes, far beyond Pluto.”

 The solar system distance to the scale showing the newly discovered 2018 VG18 Solar system Distance to scale showing the newly discovered 2018 VG18 “Farout” compared with other known Solar System objects. Credit: Roberto Molar Candanosa / Scott S. Sheppard / Carnegie Department of Science.

An astronomical unit is the distance from the earth to the sun. Pluto is our solar system’s most famous dwarf plane, and it’s about 34 AU from the sun. It took NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft nine years to come to Pluto, and Farout is about 3.5 times farther than Pluto, so it takes about 31 years to spacecraft reach Farout.

Farout joins a number of other dwarf planets in the outer reach of the Sun. In recent years, astronomers have discovered Goblin, Biden, Sedna and Eris in the region from about 80 AU to 96 AU.

The same team behind Farout also discovered Goblin, and 2012 VP113 also knows as Biden. Their work indicates the potential presence of a huge planet, perhaps up to 10 times the size of the earth. In a 2016 paper, the astronomers Mike Brown and Konstantin Batygin presented evidence that supported the existence of the same invisible planet, nicknamed Planet X and Planet 9. This undiscovered planet is called a super-Neptune. In their papers, the two astronomers say that the paths in these distant dwarf planets are assembled in such a way that it can not be an accident. There must be another big planet out there, herding them through space.

 The theoretical path in the theoretical plane 9. Where will Farout's track fit? Image Credit: Caltech / R. Hurt (IPAC) The theoretical path in the theoretical plane 9. Where will Farout’s track fit? Image Credit: Caltech / R. Hurt (IPAC)

It will take a while before astronomers determine Farout’s track. But if it looks like it fits in with the others, it will be even more convincing evidence of the existence of the elusive Planet 9.

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