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Juice WRLD's “Death Race for Love” – ​​Variety

Juice WRLD is an adult. The 19-year-old who drowned young heart in the palliative nose of drugs at "Goodbye & Good Riddance", his debut album? It was so last summer. When the Chicago rapper broke into the ordinary seems out of the question in 2018, the more he distilled emo rap – one of Soundcloud's generation's iterations, infused with the humble melody frame of self-pitying anxiety – in memorable hooks, especially on his card -shopping breakout single, "Lucid Dreams." In other places on "Goodbye & Good Riddance", listeners found the soundtrack to a breakup consisting of largely monotonous trap production built up of intense pop-punk feelings. 1 9659002] But the love of the juice for ear tunes was burdened all the time by often laughing darling texts that resembled the Irish, diarrhea of ​​a teenager whose heart pain over a month-long relationship is removed is perceived as the end of the universe. Standouts on the album were lost among this repetitive aura. But the simplicity of his hooks, while the petulant, was also part of what made them unimaginably catchy. More reviews Juice seemed to shift away from this schtick on last fall's collabok with Future on "WRLD ON DRUGS", a forgettable and somewhat inexplicable – save for the parties' shared thirst for the numbing balm of addiction – link up. But on his second album, "Death Race for Love," Juice somehow returns to his brand of sad rap, with all its strengths and weaknesses, while studying effectively against any…

Juice WRLD is an adult. The 19-year-old who drowned young heart in the palliative nose of drugs at “Goodbye & Good Riddance”, his debut album? It was so last summer.

When the Chicago rapper broke into the ordinary seems out of the question in 2018, the more he distilled emo rap – one of Soundcloud’s generation’s iterations, infused with the humble melody frame of self-pitying anxiety – in memorable hooks, especially on his card -shopping breakout single, “Lucid Dreams.” In other places on “Goodbye & Good Riddance”, listeners found the soundtrack to a breakup consisting of largely monotonous trap production built up of intense pop-punk feelings. 1

9659002] But the love of the juice for ear tunes was burdened all the time by often laughing darling texts that resembled the Irish, diarrhea of ​​a teenager whose heart pain over a month-long relationship is removed is perceived as the end of the universe. Standouts on the album were lost among this repetitive aura. But the simplicity of his hooks, while the petulant, was also part of what made them unimaginably catchy.

Juice seemed to shift away from this schtick on last fall’s collabok with Future on “WRLD ON DRUGS”, a forgettable and somewhat inexplicable – save for the parties’ shared thirst for the numbing balm of addiction – link up. But on his second album, “Death Race for Love,” Juice somehow returns to his brand of sad rap, with all its strengths and weaknesses, while studying effectively against any sonic versatility and playfulness.

This evolutionary miniature was teased at “Robbery”, the album’s leading single (which leaked a few months ago). Juice leans heavily in pop-punk with elongated patterns of misery, while a wonderful piano tuning separates the track from almost every “Goodbye & Good Riddance.”

On “Death Race” his strongest, most polished melodies are shown, and the disc feels made to map as high as possible – and with an inflated 22 songs, no less. Juice even throws itself in a tedious dancehall knit doll track with “Hear Me Calling”, along with a useful Travis Scott imitation on “Big” – which emits a good sample and slider in the middle – to cover all its bases .

Anxiety and drug love are still there, but are not as elevated or clearly linked to a breakup. Rather, it is sometimes translated into a vague tortured soul character, as on “Blank”, the album’s opener, where Juice proclaims “I was here to lead the lost souls / breathe the depression when the wind is blowing.” The song’s Cringe-Y texts, again, skip what Juice is the best. He hovering contagious, over beautifully tender piano, but with lines that develop hard eye rolls: “My world revolves around a black hole, the same black hole that is instead of my soul.” Here, depression is less about suffering than about empty affectation and aesthetics; at “Farewell” it had at least one source, if it was naive and argued on the surface.

The persistent irony is that these distracting bad bars come from a rapper who has proved to be so skilled and quick freestyle. And yet, “Death Race” still shines beyond those moments. Lines are delivered uncomfortably and then become earmuffs: “Your scar is so beautiful / Isn’t it strange to give compliments?” Juice twangs on guitar-laden “Deficiencies and sins”.

Easy instrumental tubes – the piano on “Robbery”, a xylophone aid “Feeling” – diversify common pouring hats and surprisingly, Juice shows a relatively versatile palette of styles. At the “Fast” standpoint, Juice smoothly goes over to the tropics “Hear Me Calling.” Last in the album, the star “ON GOD” – essentially a Young Thug song with Juice WRLD – sees Juice Trade flows with Thug with a light and fluid chemistry. The subsequent “10 feet”, which are very similar to a late-in-the-album contemplative drake track, see Juice rapping more shaved on an atmospheric sample and dense, hardening 808s. The melodies of the invention are consistently present and enhanced even more by his knack for hooks, such as the “Ring Ring”, a bona fide hit for the genre. But Juice is beginning to welcome this time, about two-thirds of the way to 21 full-length songs and a space. It can be hard to justify as long as an album for most artists, and Juice, with bold in his efforts, turns out not to be compelling to keep you engaged, especially with only three features (Brent Faiyaz, Young Thug and Clever appear ).

But the extended directory is sure to guarantee high effects. His poppy touch and cross-genre deftness tell a similar story to Post Malone, whose own crooning, pop-friendly sound has pushed him to the top of the hip-hop food chain. With “Death Race”, Juice makes a strong case for a similar lane, albeit riddled with more anxiety, crocodile tears and styrofoam cups. It can only be Juice’s World soon enough.

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