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Iowa Poll: Republicans welcome challenger to Trump, but most back the president

The presidential power of the state's registered Republican voters is clear in the vote, with Trump serving 81% approval, 77% favorability and majority voters claiming their elections on immigration, lawsuits, tax cuts, charges and evenness push their lawyer general as good moves. And with a better than two-to-one margin, Republican voters in Iowa are giving more debt to Congressional Republicans (54%) than to the President (24%) for the party's most recent loss. There is a topic on which Iowa Republicans seem strongly critical of Trump's choice: his use of Twitter. About seven out of 10 (72%) say the president is wrong by posting potentially inflammatory messages on Twitter regularly. On other issues tested in the survey, majorities say that the president did a good move. Overall, 67% of the registered Republicans say they would definitely vote for re-election of Trump if the elections were held today, 1 9% would consider someone else and only 10% of state republicans say they would definitely vote for someone else. Republicans in Iowa are quite closely divided as to whether they feel more of a faithfulness to the President (37%) or to the Republican Party (43%). Another in five is uncertain who they are closer to. But most (55%) say they think the president cares more about people like them than about people as themselves (26%). Only a quarter (26%) said the Republican Republic of Iowa should deter challengers to the president while 63% think the party should welcome them. The percentage of welcome…

The presidential power of the state’s registered Republican voters is clear in the vote, with Trump serving 81% approval, 77% favorability and majority voters claiming their elections on immigration, lawsuits, tax cuts, charges and evenness push their lawyer general as good moves. And with a better than two-to-one margin, Republican voters in Iowa are giving more debt to Congressional Republicans (54%) than to the President (24%) for the party’s most recent loss.

There is a topic on which Iowa Republicans seem strongly critical of Trump’s choice: his use of Twitter. About seven out of 10 (72%) say the president is wrong by posting potentially inflammatory messages on Twitter regularly. On other issues tested in the survey, majorities say that the president did a good move.

Overall, 67% of the registered Republicans say they would definitely vote for re-election of Trump if the elections were held today, 1

9% would consider someone else and only 10% of state republicans say they would definitely vote for someone else.

Republicans in Iowa are quite closely divided as to whether they feel more of a faithfulness to the President (37%) or to the Republican Party (43%). Another in five is uncertain who they are closer to. But most (55%) say they think the president cares more about people like them than about people as themselves (26%).

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Only a quarter (26%) said the Republican Republic of Iowa should deter challengers to the president while 63% think the party should welcome them.

The percentage of welcome challengers is higher among Iowa Republicans with college degrees (72%) than among those without degrees (56%). It is also higher among women (66%) than men (60%) and among younger Republicans (67% among those under 45 years) than older (60% 45 and older feel so). And those who consider themselves “very conservative” are much less likely to want the party welcome challengers (47%) than those who are less conservative or moderate. These differences correspond to stronger support for Trump in some cases – gender and ideology, especially – but not all.

The overall welcoming attitude does not mean that the state’s GOP is particularly welcoming to those who have been critical of Trump, though.

Iowa Republicans are more likely to have positive views about the political figures that have sometimes been warmer than Trump than those who are routinely critical. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and soon Utah Utah Sen. Mitt Romney, Republicans who were single critics of the president, but have been publicly supporting him on other occasions, all have pretty good grades in the survey. Those who have been more open and consistently critical, including Outgoing Sens. Jeff Flake and Bob Corker and Outgoing Ohio Gov. John Kasich, is less positively shown.

The Iowa Republicans who say they feel more faithful to Trump than to the party have a particularly negative touch on the President’s Republican critics. Twenty-three percent have an unfavorable view of Corker, compared with just 4% among those who feel closer to the party. Nearly half of those who feel close to the president (46%) have a negative opinion compared with 13% of those who feel closer to the party. And the divide is almost as big at Kasich, where 43% of those who feel closer to the president see him unfavorably, compared with 12% among those who feel closer to the party.

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. Make sure the president’s prospects for those Republicans who can potentially make a run in the future, only two of the seven potential candidates tested have a majority of Iowa Republicans saying they would ever consider supporting them for the president – 59% say they could support Rubio, 53% Romney. And there are more who would consider a candidate from Nikki Haley than would rule out (46% would ever consider it, 21% would never support it).

However, there is more resistance than support, but for president runs from Kasich (39% say they would never save him, while 31% say they should consider it), Flake (47% never 14% ever) or Corker% never to 11% ever). Iowa Republicans also lean against Ben Sasse, a Republican Senator from nearby Nebraska, with 31% saying they would never vote for him and 21% said they would ever consider it.

CNN / Des Moines Register / Mediacom survey was conducted by Selzer and Co. from December 10 to 13 among a random sample of 450 registered Republican voters reached on landline phones or mobile phones by a live interviewer. Results for the selection of Republican voters have a sampling error of plus or minus 4.6 percentage points. it is larger for subgroups.


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