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If you do not want a nuclear war, Trump hopes to do this at the summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un

Whatever President Trump says or does when he holds a second historic summit with Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Wednesday and Thursday in Vietnam, he will never satisfy his Republican and democratic critics. About Trump sticks to his realistic instincts – especially pragmatic to preserve his American first agenda – and if Kim is serious about reaching any kind of nuclear control agreement, the odd couple could make history in Hanoi. And who HANOI SUMMIT NIGHTMARE SCENARIO: BAD DEALS AND LITTLE CHANGE None of this will be easy. Trump – or maybe Trump and Kim &#821 1; can even be awarded the Nobel Prize. Kim's father and grandfather – who ruled North Korea in front of him – has a history of overcoming former US presidents for both parties with the assurance of cooperative behavior and then breaking their promises. The Nordic region has invested heavily in developing a small nuclear arsenal that Kim is not keen to give up and sees it as his best guarantee against any American effort to attack his poor communist nation. Trump's critics on the left and right portray him as naive and desperate to reach some agreement – some agreement – with Kim to brag about in his expected re-election campaign next year. While Kim clearly believes that nuclear weapons are his best insurance policy against a future US attack, Trump must convince the Nordic Korean leader that the exact opposite is true: only denuclearisation will guarantee North Korea's security. Will Trump…

Whatever President Trump says or does when he holds a second historic summit with Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Wednesday and Thursday in Vietnam, he will never satisfy his Republican and democratic critics.

About Trump sticks to his realistic instincts – especially pragmatic to preserve his American first agenda – and if Kim is serious about reaching any kind of nuclear control agreement, the odd couple could make history in Hanoi.

And who

HANOI SUMMIT NIGHTMARE SCENARIO: BAD DEALS AND LITTLE CHANGE

None of this will be easy.

Trump – or maybe Trump and Kim &#821

1; can even be awarded the Nobel Prize. Kim’s father and grandfather – who ruled North Korea in front of him – has a history of overcoming former US presidents for both parties with the assurance of cooperative behavior and then breaking their promises.

The Nordic region has invested heavily in developing a small nuclear arsenal that Kim is not keen to give up and sees it as his best guarantee against any American effort to attack his poor communist nation.

Trump’s critics on the left and right portray him as naive and desperate to reach some agreement – some agreement – with Kim to brag about in his expected re-election campaign next year.

While Kim clearly believes that nuclear weapons are his best insurance policy against a future US attack, Trump must convince the Nordic Korean leader that the exact opposite is true: only denuclearisation will guarantee North Korea’s security.

Will Trump succeed in getting a real deal that at least moves North Korea substantially closer to the US target of denuclination of the Korean Peninsula? Or is Washington and Pyongyang destined to be enemies far into the future, with no northern hope of peacefully giving up their nukes?

I have faith in President Trump – at least for this important national security issue. While I am a proudly registered Republican, I cannot say that I always agree with the President, nor do I embrace any of the more outlandish and fiery rhetoric that he has shown in North Korea.

But the good news is that Trump has a unique set of features that Washington’s foreign policy elites lack: a clear imagination to see things differently, with the ability to apply his successful business skills to global hard-hit policies.

In combination with President Trump’s willingness to try new approaches in international affairs that others think is crazy, he has taken the old lesson on how to handle the hermit and lit it in fire.

Amen.

The American President’s imagination and principled realism could make history in the coming days. I believe there is a clear blueprint for launching a new era of peace on the Peninsula of Korea, protecting our allies in the region and giving a real chance to see North Korea give up its nuclear weapons.

What is needed now?

] Building on the Singapore Summit in June, here are some steps that can make the Hanoi Summit a success:

First, President Trump must have Kim understand that America is not North Korea’s enemy, has no desire to crush Kim and his regime and can trust it.

To do this, President Trump must make conditions where Kim feels comfortable enough to begin the process of denuclearisation.

While Kim clearly believes that nuclear weapons are his best insurance policy against a future US attack, Trump must convince the North Korean leader that the exact opposite is true: only denuclearisation will guarantee North Korea’s security.

If Trump and Kim agree to sign a simple poem War declaration ending the Korean War once and for all, tensions between the two nations can make dramatic relief.

Kim would have the proof he needed to not only rely on our intent but to go back to his own people – especially those in the military and in his circle of leadership – and say that America no longer has any hostile intent and our relationship has changed fundamentally.

A peace treaty would also allow Trump to claim a historic victory. The US president should offer a treaty without any conditions.

After all, a peace treaty would not be an American concession. It would simply admit the obvious fact that the Korean War ended with a gunshot in July 1953. It was a long time before Kim was born and when President Trump was just a 7-year-old boy.

Secondly, US officials had to make sure we were able to communicate with the North Koreans – especially if another crisis spreads in the future.

To do that, both sides should create small connection offices in each other’s capitals. This would enable close direct communication and understanding to ensure that important messages do not take days to travel from one part of the world to another.

Many will argue that this is a type of de facto diplomatic recognition of the North Korean government. Perhaps it is true, but with North Korea potentially capable of beating the United States with nuclear weapons, one can understand the idea of ​​the nation’s leader more important than ever.

The establishment of liaison offices would also allow the North to get a better window in our own diplomatic strategies and national security thinking, which helps to ensure that Kim and his regime do not fail our intention.

There is no weakness in wanting to have a dialogue with those with whom you have differences in order to avert an armed conflict. That is why we have diplomatic relations with Russia, China and many other nations that we do not agree with.

Watch it that way: North Korea was created in 1948, when Korea was divided into north and south. The United States has never had diplomatic relations with the North and even fought a war against the nation for three years. But a strategy for using diplomatic isolation to tip the regime has not worked for 71 years – so why would we believe continuing this strategy will work now?

Third – and very important – the world must see the first steps towards the north give up their nuclear weapons.

The formula to do this is well known now. Kim has already said that he would dismantle his nuclear facility in Yongbyon if Washington offers “equivalent action” – which relieves relief from economic sanctions that make North difficult.

Trump administration has recently recently begun to move away from the idea that no sanction relief can be

President Trump needs a way to take pressure from Kim without getting a political repetition back in the US by critics saying he is doing a gigantic concession for meaningless promises by Kim.

This is where South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in comes in. Moon told Trump that he would quickly move on inter-Korean economic projects that would be worth tens of billions of dollars in the north to get Kim to give up his nuclear weapons. [19659003] Considering North Korea’s economy, it’s just worth $ 16 billion – half of Vermont’s size – an economic shot in the arm would be a game switch for Kim’s re ime. My bet is that the north would jump on the chance and all sides would clearly get something they want.

Finally, we should not forget the more than 7,000 brave American war arenas that are still “inexplicable” from the Korean War.

In addition to the fact that these Americans do not have action in the previous war, there are also many North Korean soldiers whose status was never resolved. Both nations should step up their efforts to resolve these cases once and for all.

Washington and Pyongyang should form common law that can work together and excavate the battlefields and areas where it is likely to remain.

History Tells Us This can build an important trust between nations and heal the wounds of an old war. This is what happened when Vietnam and the United States initiated such efforts before restoring diplomatic relations.

History shows that nations that in themselves do not trust each other have a long way to go to bridge the gap and achieve lasting peace.

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It is both in the United States and North Korea’s interest to end wars between us which, in the worst case, could explode again with nuclear weapons and kill millions of people.

Even those of you who oppose President Trump and want him out of the White House as soon as possible should root for his success at the summit. If he can in any way eliminate the North Korean nuclear threat in exchange for economic and diplomatic concessions, it will be a victory for the American people and for people around the world.

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