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Hubble performs experiments again after 3 weeks of hiatus

The Hubble Space Telescope performs experiments after a mechanical failure past the groundbreaking observatory for three weeks. In a statement…

The Hubble Space Telescope performs experiments after a mechanical failure past the groundbreaking observatory for three weeks.

In a statement on Saturday, NASA officials said the telescope was retrieved online Friday and conducted its first experiment since 5 October. For almost three decades circling the world, Hubble is credited with an increased understanding of the solar system and how it was formed.

HUBBLE DOWN: NASA is working to fix groundbreaking telescope

On October 5, the telescope launched in “safe mode” after the failure of one of its six gyroscopes, keeping the telescope tapered exactly for longer periods, as it sends data back to researchers. The failure was not unexpected because it “had shown residence behavior for about a year,” said NASA officials at that time.

The error caused the total number of lost gyroscopes to three. Hubble only needs three gyroscopes to be fully operational and the 5th failure would have left the telescope with the necessary trees – except another was rotated at too high speeds, NASA officials said. It was previously closed.

But NASA says it has solved the problem and put protective measures in space so it does not happen again.

“Last week, the Hubble Operation Team commanded to perform many maneuvers or yards, and switch gyro between different modes of operation,” said the Space Agency’s Saturday statement. “Clearing what was thought to be blocking the components of the gyro that gave them too high values.” [19659024] Astronomers are undoubtedly relieved. While NASA pushed their own space ferries, the spacecraft were able to serve the telescope, and they did it five times before the commute was closed in 2011. Now, NASA has no opportunity to get astronauts to the telescope for repairs.

Telescope can work

Hubble’s successor, James Webb Space Telescope, is also experiencing problems.

Started in 2007 and costs $ 500 million, Webb has been delayed until March 2021 – provided that there is congress approval to continue after development costs broke down to $ 8 billion in 2011. NASA estimates it needs $ 9 billion now.

The Web is intended to revolutionize the world’s understanding of planet and star formation.

Alex Stuckey writes about NASA and the Houston Chronicle Environment. You can reach her at [email protected] or Twitter.com/alexdstuckey.

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