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How ISIS increases in the Philippines as it fluctuates in the Middle East

Mr. Indama, the former fighter who says he left Abu Sayyaf last year for rejecting the Islamic state's ideology, claimed he saw foreign operations in the basilica jungle camp. The idea that no foreign warriors have stolen at Basilan was split in July when it was the site of the first suicide bombing in the Philippines. The Islamic state argued that the attack, which killed 11 people, had been a Moroccan recruiting job. The Philippine authorities originally denied the attack that had been committed by a suicide bomber, much less than a foreigner. A week later, they admitted that it had been carried out by a German-Moroccan suicide bomber. Last year, a Spaniard was arrested in Basilan with bomb-making material. An Egyptian carrying $ 19,000 in cash was also stopped on its way to Basilan, according to Mujiv Hataman, Governor of the Autonomous Muslim Region of the Philippines. Mr. Hataman, who travels with armored convoy, expressed concern that if the bombing reports are intensified in Jolo, militants will release undiscovered in Basilan via small boats. They are already traveling among Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines over poorly patrolled seas. "One problem goes away and another begins," said Hataman. Interior Minister Eduardo Año has accused the Jolo attack of an Indonesian couple Oberun Besana confirmed that a number of foreign soldiers were hiding in the Jolo hills, led by Hatib Hajan Sawadjaan, who is believed to have replaced Hapilon as the regional Islamic State emir. The Islamic State Cap never seems…

Mr. Indama, the former fighter who says he left Abu Sayyaf last year for rejecting the Islamic state’s ideology, claimed he saw foreign operations in the basilica jungle camp.

The idea that no foreign warriors have stolen at Basilan was split in July when it was the site of the first suicide bombing in the Philippines.

The Islamic state argued that the attack, which killed 11 people, had been a Moroccan recruiting job. The Philippine authorities originally denied the attack that had been committed by a suicide bomber, much less than a foreigner. A week later, they admitted that it had been carried out by a German-Moroccan suicide bomber.

Last year, a Spaniard was arrested in Basilan with bomb-making material. An Egyptian carrying $ 19,000 in cash was also stopped on its way to Basilan, according to Mujiv Hataman, Governor of the Autonomous Muslim Region of the Philippines.

Mr. Hataman, who travels with armored convoy, expressed concern that if the bombing reports are intensified in Jolo, militants will release undiscovered in Basilan via small boats. They are already traveling among Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines over poorly patrolled seas.

“One problem goes away and another begins,” said Hataman.

Interior Minister Eduardo Año has accused the Jolo attack of an Indonesian couple Oberun Besana confirmed that a number of foreign soldiers were hiding in the Jolo hills, led by Hatib Hajan Sawadjaan, who is believed to have replaced Hapilon as the regional Islamic State emir.

The Islamic State Cap never seems far from the surface of the southern Philippines. At a government ceremony in Basilan where houses were awarded to former Abu Sayyaf rebels during a prolonged peaceful agreement to give autonomy to the Muslim south, security was so heavy that they were outnumbered by Filipino soldiers.

Jem Habing, 22, a former Abu Sayyaf fighter who said he had merged at age 11, like many children in his village, seemed non-existent when asked if he could join.

“They convinced me that you die in battle, you will be rewarded in afterwards,” he said. “They said it was the right way.”

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