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“Himalayan Viagra” threatened by climate change: researchers

The fungus known in Asia as "Himalayan Viagra" ̵ 1; like this – has no scientifically proven benefits, but people…



The fungus known in Asia as “Himalayan Viagra” ̵

1; like this – has no scientifically proven benefits, but people think it cures everything from impotence to cancer

A reputed larvae sponge, which is more valuable than gold, is called “Himalayan Viagra” in Asia, where it is seen as a subcutaneous drug, becomes harder to find due to climate change, researchers say on Monday.

People in China and Nepal have been killed in conflicts over the years over the difficult mushroom “yarchagumba”, formally known as Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

Although it has no scientifically proven benefits, people who boil yarchagumba in water to make tea or add it to soups and pots think it cures everything from impotence to cancer.

It is “one of the world’s most valuable biological raw materials, which provides a crucial source of income for hundreds of thousands of collectors,” the report in Negotiations by the National Academy of Sciences a peer-reviewed US journal.

Over the past few decades, it has risen in popularity and prices have risen – it can bring up to three times the price of gold in Beijing, researchers say.

While many have suspected overcrowding, the reason for their lack, researchers would find out more.

Then they interviewed about four dozen harvesters, collectors and traders of pr

They also published previously published scientific literature, including interviews with more than 800 people in Nepal, Bhutan, India and China, to understand the apparent decline.

Weather patterns, geographical factors and environmental conditions were also analyzed. to create a map of yarchagumba production in the region.



The prized larva sponge is a hero in Asia, this is sold in the Chinese city of Gannan, in Gansu province, in June 2013

“Using data spanning almost two decades and four countries, (vi) revealed that larvae production of larvae is decreasing throughout its range,” the report says.

“While the collectors increasingly attributed the decline in larvae to overcome, habitats and production modeling suggest that climate change is also likely to play a role.”

Special Temperatures

The Conventional Sponge exists just above an altitude of 11,500 meters, and forms when the parasite spreads into a larva and slowly kills it.

To grow, it needs a specific climate that is fatty – with winter temperatures below 0 Celsius (32 Fahrenheit) – but where the soil is not permanently frozen

“Such conditions are typically present at the margin of permafrost areas,” said PNAS report, led by researchers at Stanford University.

“Given that winter temperatures have warmed significantly from 1979 to 2013 over much of its range, and especially in Bhutan, its populations are likely to have been adversely affected.”

The warming trend has particularly affected Bhutan, with average winter temperatures ” which increases by 3.5-4 C over most of its predicted habitat (+1.1 C per decade on average), “added the study.

Researchers also found that the vegetation on the Tibetan plateau “did not shift upwards as a result of climate warming 2000-2014”, suggesting that the larvae will not be able to easily move into the rock to colder habitats when the climate warms.

This stems from harvesters who sell the fungus to survive, “stressing the need for alternative supply options in the communities that are due to this niche,” warned researchers.


Explore further:
Nepal & Himalayan Viagra & # 39; harvest drops to record low

More information:
Kelly A. Hopping, et al., “The fall of larvae in the Himalayan region due to climate change and overhearing” PNAS (2018). www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1811591115

Journal Reference:
Negotiations by the National Academy of Sciences

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