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Halton considered a “calculated risk area” for the Lyme disease

Ticks are also sent to the health department of residents who have found the small arachnids on themselves or family members. In 2017 and 2018, two ticks acquired in Halton from human sources were positive for the Lyme disease every year. The Health Department monitors cases of the Lyme disease in Halton residents, with 44 laboratory reports for Lyme disease tests reported to officials in 2018. Of these, 10 were classified as confirmed cases and two were likely cases of the disease. Two of the confirmed cases were found to have exposure to the Lyme disease within Halton, while the rest came from other locations in Ontario and further including New York State and Europe. Halton's new estimated risk area status does not come as a surprise to locals living with the Lyme disease, such as Jodi Stansfield, who is more aware than most of whom the black flock population has increased in Ontario. Georgetown woman has been fighting the serious bacterial infection for a decade. She worked as a high school teacher when she began to experience intense dizziness &#821 1; a symptom physician criticized up to a viral inner infection. As headaches, dizziness, nausea and extreme fatigue began, Stansfield continued to work during the months and years that followed, and finally had to leave his job and stop running. "At this time, I slept 18 hours a day, and I was in so much pain," she says. "My mother moved in to help raise our daughter. I was…

Ticks are also sent to the health department of residents who have found the small arachnids on themselves or family members. In 2017 and 2018, two ticks acquired in Halton from human sources were positive for the Lyme disease every year.

The Health Department monitors cases of the Lyme disease in Halton residents, with 44 laboratory reports for Lyme disease tests reported to officials in 2018. Of these, 10 were classified as confirmed cases and two were likely cases of the disease.

Two of the confirmed cases were found to have exposure to the Lyme disease within Halton, while the rest came from other locations in Ontario and further including New York State and Europe.

Halton’s new estimated risk area status does not come as a surprise to locals living with the Lyme disease, such as Jodi Stansfield, who is more aware than most of whom the black flock population has increased in Ontario.

Georgetown woman has been fighting the serious bacterial infection for a decade. She worked as a high school teacher when she began to experience intense dizziness &#821

1; a symptom physician criticized up to a viral inner infection. As headaches, dizziness, nausea and extreme fatigue began, Stansfield continued to work during the months and years that followed, and finally had to leave his job and stop running.

“At this time, I slept 18 hours a day, and I was in so much pain,” she says. “My mother moved in to help raise our daughter. I was told that I would be in wheelchair for the rest of my life. “

Stansfield saw more than 30 specialists over a 5½ year period before being diagnosed with Lyme Disease – A conclusion reached by traveling to the United States for post-test testing which was done in Canada became negative results.

“We celebrate being happy to receive an answer,” she recalls. “But we do not realize that this was a whole new fight.”

A variety of co-infections may come with Lyme disease and Stansfield also diagnosed with Babesia, Bartonella, Ehrlichia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and a viral infection.

The local woman has been on high dose antibiotics since July 2014 to treat the disease, along with malaria and a long list of prescription drugs and supplements In total, she takes 45 pills each day to fight the Lyme disease, co-infections and their devastating effects.

But there is a light at the end of the tunnel f R Stansfield. With treatment, she is slowly improving.

“I have much less pain, and I’m back to driving again,” she says. “Fatigue and brain mist continue to be my biggest challenges. I sleep a lot. But when I can get those in control, I hope to go back to work.”

Meanwhile, Stansfield has worked hard to educate the locals on the Lyme disease, co-infections and how they can protect themselves. She has previously worked as a board member of Lyme Ontario and continues to help the organization raise awareness.

She encourages anyone who develops the classic rash against irregular eyes to seek antibiotic treatment immediately, as early intervention is the key. She says that some people may reject it as another type of bite and not seek medical attention.

She also spreads the word that not everyone who has Lyme – including herself – will experience the rash so commonly associated with the disease. [19659002] Stansfield is quite certain that she did not contract the Lyme disease locally but says she has a number of friends in the Lyme community who live in Georgetown, with two believing that they have developed the bacterial infection after having been bitten in their own backyard . [19659002] Halton joins many municipalities across the province defined as estimated risk areas for the Lyme disease by Public Health Ontario, which issues a map annually to raise public awareness.

“PHO’s Ontario Lyme Disease Estimated Risk Map also helps clinics in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease, with potential exposures or attachment bites in the risk areas shown on the map, indicating greater concern about the risks of the Lyme disease,” explains Dr. Mark Nelder, an entomologist at Public Health Ontario. “The public health staff can also use the map during the Lyme disease investigations when determining the most likely exposure locations.”

So what does Halton do in response to the new status?

“Unlike mosquitoes and West Nile viruses, there are no plant protection opportunities for ticks and Lyme diseases,” says Meghani. “The health care staff continues to monitor and communicate the risk of exposure to black ticks and Lyme diseases, so residents, local doctors and healthcare providers will get the most up-to-date information to make the most informed decisions to protect themselves. “

The Health Department and PHO officials recommend that the local population take personal protective measures to prevent exposure to the Lyme disease, such as wearing insecticides, long-sleeved shirts and pants in socks, stay on track and check skin for ticks after spending time in areas considered suitable fastening lakes.

“If people start to feel sick days or weeks after hiking and they have been in a risk field in Lyme disease they should contact our health care provider for any diagnosis and treatment, “says Nelder.

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