Categories: world

Google Chrome can soon block back-button hijacks

1; completely different pages, or reload the page you're already on so you can never leave as something weird digital Hotel California . Known internally as "history manipulation", it's something Google engineers have had in its sights for a while. Now they have developed a way for the system to reliably check if the trick is in use at a certain location. At this stage, it's an experimental process, shown only by Chromium, and any positives are easily flagged to the user and the data is sent back to Google for analysis. It is also worth pointing out that a Chromium code treaty is not a Chromo feature and there is every chance that it will never see the light of day in its current form, although there is a lot of "on message" for the latest updates in chrome. In recent months, we have seen complete prohibition of some suspicious ads, punishing unencrypted sites, Symantec certificates, plus, of course, Chrome caused the killing of Adobe Flash (and good riddance). As ever, Chrome goes through three steps – Dev, Canary, Beta before stopping Stabil, which means that it will be at least three months before this feature is available to the public, and probably a little longer than that, but it's good to know that Chrome is still looking for new ways to make us so safer. Meanwhile, you will know if it's live, if you feel insecure enough to check the flag menu – it will look like this:…

1; completely different pages, or reload the page you’re already on so you can never leave as something weird digital Hotel California .

Known internally as “history manipulation”, it’s something Google engineers have had in its sights for a while. Now they have developed a way for the system to reliably check if the trick is in use at a certain location.

At this stage, it’s an experimental process, shown only by Chromium, and any positives are easily flagged to the user and the data is sent back to Google for analysis.

It is also worth pointing out that a Chromium code treaty is not a Chromo feature and there is every chance that it will never see the light of day in its current form, although there is a lot of “on message” for the latest updates in chrome.

In recent months, we have seen complete prohibition of some suspicious ads, punishing unencrypted sites, Symantec certificates, plus, of course, Chrome caused the killing of Adobe Flash (and good riddance).

As ever, Chrome goes through three steps – Dev, Canary, Beta before stopping Stabil, which means that it will be at least three months before this feature is available to the public, and probably a little longer than that, but it’s good to know that Chrome is still looking for new ways to make us so safer.

Meanwhile, you will know if it’s live, if you feel insecure enough to check the flag menu – it will look like this: # enable-skip-redirecting-entries-on-back-forward- ui μ

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