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Google Bolo Reading Tutor App launched in India, now available for Android

When smartphone penetration expands in rural India, Google hopes to help children with their reading skills. The company on Wednesday unveiled its new Bolo Android app which is a speech-based reading tool aimed at rural players, who otherwise would not have access to a good education system. Being released in India first, the Bolo app is now available for free via Google Play and can work offline. There is no word when the app will be released in other markets. The government-back school system in most Indian states leaves much to be desired and it is often the only vacant avenue for education in rural areas and for children from economically struggling families. Google hopes to change it by using smartphones, which are increasingly becoming a common sight even in rural areas. "We believe the technology has the power to help change teaching and learning and has actively steered our products, programs and philanthropy to ensure that all students can benefit from it," said Google in a statement. For native Hindi speakers in their current avatar, the Bolo app helps the children improve their Hindi and English reading skills by encouraging them to read aloud, bringing a large number of engaging stories that the company hopes will help children improve their skills. The app has been designed so that children do not need help using it and can read it all by themselves. Google notes that all reading material on the app is free and it cooperates with other companies…

When smartphone penetration expands in rural India, Google hopes to help children with their reading skills. The company on Wednesday unveiled its new Bolo Android app which is a speech-based reading tool aimed at rural players, who otherwise would not have access to a good education system. Being released in India first, the Bolo app is now available for free via Google Play and can work offline. There is no word when the app will be released in other markets.

The government-back school system in most Indian states leaves much to be desired and it is often the only vacant avenue for education in rural areas and for children from economically struggling families. Google hopes to change it by using smartphones, which are increasingly becoming a common sight even in rural areas.

“We believe the technology has the power to help change teaching and learning and has actively steered our products, programs and philanthropy to ensure that all students can benefit from it,” said Google in a statement.

For native Hindi speakers in their current avatar, the Bolo app helps the children improve their Hindi and English reading skills by encouraging them to read aloud, bringing a large number of engaging stories that the company hopes will help children improve their skills. The app has been designed so that children do not need help using it and can read it all by themselves. Google notes that all reading material on the app is free and it cooperates with other companies to provide more content to Bolo. The app is dependent on Google’s speech recognition and text-to-speech technology.

To attract kids to use the app, Google has added in-app rewards and badges n to Bolo and word games.  google bolo 1<div class="e3lan e3lan-in-post1"><script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"></script>  <ins class="adsbygoogle" style="display:block" data-ad-client="ca-pub-7542518979287585" data-ad-slot="2196042218" data-ad-format="auto"></ins> <script> (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); </script></div> gadgets 360 Google Bolo

The Google Bolo app comes with 16 pre-installed stories and more can be downloaded

The company says the app contains an animated digital assistant named Diya. This assistant can read the text aloud to the children and even explain the meaning of the English text. Diya can speak English and Hindi, and encourages the kids by giving them compliments when they finish a task.

Furthermore, the app can be shared among many children and provides a personal experience for everyone. So, if a family has two siblings, they can both use the app and track their individual progress.

Considering that the app will be used by children, there is an important issue of privacy. Google notes that it collects images and voice data from the app, but it is stored locally and is designed to help work. In addition to these personal data, the search giant also collects other anonymous information, eg. device information, user statistics, preferred language, reading and search history and other settings. More information about Google’s data collection from the Bolo app can be found on the company’s website.

According to Google, the Bolo app is still in beta and the company will work with its partners such as Kaivalya, Room to Read, Saajha, and Pratham to further refine it and bring the app to more children. The company has already conducted a controlled pilot for three months in 200 villages in Uttar Pradesh’s Unnao district and it says that the first results were encouraging.

“With the help of the ASER Center, we piloted Bolo over 200 villages in Uttar Pradesh, India, in recent months,” Google wrote in a blog post. “Early results are very encouraging, and we found that 64 percent of children showed improved reading ability in just 3 months.”

Mountain View, California’s based company also revealed that it plans to add more features to the app, including one that can help kids improve their vocabulary. It also works to add support for more Indian languages ​​to Bolo, but the company does not share a timeline for the same.

The Bolo app can be downloaded from Google Play and works with any Android phone running KitKat or higher. It comes with 16 pre-installed stories and more can be downloaded. The total size of the app is less than 50 MB, which includes voice modules and the whole experience.

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