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German Voters Deal Angela Merkels Coalition Another Return

The poor who show in Hesse, home to Germany's financial industry, further reveal Ms. Merkel to a potential challenge for…

The poor who show in Hesse, home to Germany’s financial industry, further reveal Ms. Merkel to a potential challenge for her Christian Democratic Union, a possible step towards replacing her as Chancellor.

Ms. Merkel’s conservatives dropped to 27% of the vote in Hesse, while the Social Democrats, Chancellor’s junior coalition partner in the federal government, fell to 19.8%, according to dividend surveys from the ZDF transmitter. In the last election in 2013, the parties fell by 38.3% and 30.7% respectively.

The vote in Hesse marks the second major setback in recent weeks for both parties, who suffered from similar losses in Bavaria earlier this month.

The results are likely to provide support to rivals Ms. Merkel in her party and increase pressure to replace her as president of a party convention in December, according to Robin Alexander, a political journalist who wrote a best selling book about Ms. Merkel’s decision to open the country’s borders for a large influx of asylum seekers in 201

5.

They can also boost the power of social democratic grass roots to leave coalition in an attempt to stop voting rights. After completion of investigations, Andrea Nahles, Social Democrat leader, was released to make a series of proposals to improve the government’s work and that the success of these efforts would determine whether the party would remain in the coalition. [19659003] “Federal policies have contributed to these losses. The coalition state is not acceptable,” said Nahles at a press conference. She said that her party’s continued participation in the government would depend on the implementation of a new “binding roadmap” for the coalition she would present in the next few days.

 A woman made her vote on Sunday in state elections in Hesse, hosting one of Europe's key financial institutions, Frankfurt.

A woman made her vote on Sunday in state elections in Hesse, hosting one of Europe’s key financiers, Frankfurt.


Photo:

Torsten Silz / Agence France-Presse / Getty Images

Both parties have seen their grades plummeted since the federal elections in September 2017. Last week, a nationwide Emnid survey found that Ms Merkel’s conservative block has shrunk to a record low of 24% support, down from 32.9%, while the Social Democrats fell from 20.5% to 15%.

Hesse, home to about six million people, is currently ruled by a coalition between Conservatives and Greens, which almost doubled the 2013 results and is expected to win 19.8% of the vote. Social Democrats are not part of the ruling coalition in Hesse.

The Hesse coalition can continue with a majority of just one seat in parliament.

Alternatives to Germany, called AfD, are forecast to be almost tripled 2013 by 13 percent in Hesse according to the exit investigations, and would then be represented in all of Germany’s 16 regional parliaments and in the federal assembly.

Hesse, a wealthy region hosting Europe’s key economic centers, Frankfurt, is close to full employment, with unemployment of only 4.4 percent below the national average.

Despite the success, Hesse has become the latest state to be absorbed by the polarization of German politics that has experienced the party system since the migration crisis in 2015.

“The voices here were very happy but we had no chance of this hurricane blowing in your face from Berlin, “said Volker Bouffier, Executive Vice President of Hess e and local CDU leader. “We need less fears in Berlin, or even better no one.”

Political tourism has greatly reduced Ms Merkel’s conservative and social democrats, who ruled in a so-called great coalition since 2013, while the parties on the right and left as AfD and Greens continue to rise.

Political turbulence has greatly reduced Ms Merkel’s conservative and social democrats, who ruled in a so-called great coalition since 2013, while the parties on the right and left as AFD and Green continue to rise.

Ms. Merkel said last week that no more time should be “wasted” in the debate about the events of 2015.

However, in a sign of a rising uprising, one of her senior leaders, Health Minister Jens Spahn, came on television on Sunday night after the polls closed in Hesse to say that the party had to find new ways to regain its strength before the December elections.

“We must strive to have debates and not try to shut them down”. Spahn said.

Write to Bojan Pancevski at [email protected]

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