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Following the Christchurch and Sri Lanka attacks, global calls to assess social media: NPR

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to reporters at a press conference on Wednesday. She announced New Zealand and France will lead a global effort to interrupt the use of social media as a tool to promote terrorism. Phil Walter / Getty Images hide caption change caption Phil Walter / Getty Images New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to reporters at a press conference on Wednesday. She announced New Zealand and France will lead a global effort to stop using social media as a tool to promote terrorism. Phil Walter / Getty Images New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced that she and French President Emmanuel Macron will lead a global effort to stop social media from promoting terrorism in the wake of recent attacks that destroyed New Zealand and Sri Lanka. [19659009] "This is not about freedom of speech, it is about preventing violent extremism and terrorism online," Ardern told a press conference at a news conference in Auckland on Wednesday. She described how the white supremacist gun in Christchurch, who killed 50 people in two mosques in March, had no right to live the attack. Carrying a camera attached to a helmet, he sent his shooting booth on Facebook; The company later removed the video. "What we are trying to address here is a global issue and therefore I believe that a global response is needed," she said. Macron and Ardern are planning to host a meeting with world leaders and technology executives in Paris…

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to reporters at a press conference on Wednesday. She announced New Zealand and France will lead a global effort to interrupt the use of social media as a tool to promote terrorism.

Phil Walter / Getty Images

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to reporters at a press conference on Wednesday. She announced New Zealand and France will lead a global effort to stop using social media as a tool to promote terrorism.

Phil Walter / Getty Images

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced that she and French President Emmanuel Macron will lead a global effort to stop social media from promoting terrorism in the wake of recent attacks that destroyed New Zealand and Sri Lanka. [19659009] “This is not about freedom of speech, it is about preventing violent extremism and terrorism online,” Ardern told a press conference at a news conference in Auckland on Wednesday.

She described how the white supremacist gun in Christchurch, who killed 50 people in two mosques in March, had no right to live the attack. Carrying a camera attached to a helmet, he sent his shooting booth on Facebook; The company later removed the video. “What we are trying to address here is a global issue and therefore I believe that a global response is needed,” she said.

Macron and Ardern are planning to host a meeting with world leaders and technology executives in Paris on May 15, along with a Tech for Humanity G7 digital meeting. ministers.

Ardern says their efforts will uphold the principles of a free internet, but Adrian Shahbaz, a research director for DC-based watchdog Freedom House, worries where the discussions can lead. “There is this tendency for large-scale, national security crises and terrorist attacks to overreact the problem,” he tells the NPR.

In the rush to deal with the massacres, Shahbaz says, leaders can take laws and regulations that violate people’s integrity and freedom of expression. “One of the ideas that Jacinda Ardern mentioned was perhaps due to the flow of life. The fear we have is that we are the type of sleep migration towards a future where all social media posts are filtered before they are posted.”

At least 21 countries blocked social media between 2017 and 2018, according to Freedom House.

In Sri Lanka, the island nation still shrugged off Easter Sunday’s terrorist attacks that killed more than 350 people in churches and hotels, and the government chose to shut down Facebook and Instagram to prevent false information from spreading online.

The Sri Lankan authorities used the same tactics in 2018 to stop anti-Muslim rumors and documented images after the wrong information in the country.

Shahbaz says the suspension in response to Sunday’s bombings may have prevented people from communicating with their loved ones, seeking protection, and accessing accurate information. “We should treat the cause of the problem rather than its symptoms,” he says.

Robert Pape, a professor in Chicago, specializing in international security and the director of the Chicago Security and Threats project, says the Paris Summit is a good step, but terrorist experts should be invited.

This is because social media has become the “center” for spreading terrorism, Pape says.

“Social media offers opportunities to Islamic terrorists, to white supremacist terrorists, and even school shooters to reinforce themselves, honor to themselves in the way no other media platform does.”

The Sri Lankan government blamed the local militant group National Thoughheed Jamath for Sunday’s massacre and said members received international help. 19659009] ISIS claimed responsibility on Tuesday for the coordinated explosions, showing a video of the alleged attackers who promised Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Pape says it is “almost certainly the case”, in line with the group’s April declaration that a campaign of revenge against the international coalition that defeated its territorial unity in Iraq and Syria was begun.

International terrorist groups usually cooperate with local groups, Pape adds. Local suicide bombers carry out the international group’s mission and receive “re-alignment” from the video, photos and stories spread by the larger organization online, he says.

This week, a Sri Lankan minister said the bombing was a retaliation for the Muslims killed in Christchurch.

“I’ve seen reports of these statements,” Ardern told reporters Wednesday. “We haven’t received anything officially or have received any intelligence reports confirming what has been said in Sri Lanka.”

Raffaello Pantucci, a counter-terrorist expert at the Royal United Services Institute, a tank in London, tells the NPR he does not see a link between the two attacks. “An operation of this size and scale would have taken some time to prepare.”

Nevertheless, he says that the trends of terrorism are bleak. “Violence has become the message as opposed to a message advanced by violence.”

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