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Extinct airless bird “comes back to life after developing for the second time”

An airless bird that was released when its home island was flooded by the sea "came back to life" when a similar species developed in the same place as scientists have discovered. Researchers from the University of Portsmouth and the Natural History Museum found that a railway collection successfully colonized an isolated atoll called Aldabra in the Indian Ocean on two occasions separated by tens of thousands of years. And on both occasions the white-colored railway – native to Madagascar – was developed altogether The last surviving colony of the runaway rails is still on the island. The same species of bird colonized the same island twice, and both times it became volatile in record time. https://t.co/VMeZ6IkTgi &#821 1; Natural History Museum (@NHM_London) May 10, 2019 A spokesman from Portsmouth said: "This is the first time iterative development – the repeated evolution of similar or parallel structures from the same ancestor but at different times – have been seen in rails and one of the most significant in bird posts. " He explained that the railway is persistent colonizers that would migrate from Madagascar under frequent population explosions. A group of colonized Aldabra atolls and because of the lack of predators such as Mauritius dodo, they developed in a way that they lost the ability to fly. He explained: "Aldabra disappeared when it was completely covered by the sea during a major abundance event about 136,000 years ago, wiping out all the fauna and flora including the aviation railway. "…

An airless bird that was released when its home island was flooded by the sea “came back to life” when a similar species developed in the same place as scientists have discovered.

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth and the Natural History Museum found that a railway collection successfully colonized an isolated atoll called Aldabra in the Indian Ocean on two occasions separated by tens of thousands of years.

And on both occasions the white-colored railway – native to Madagascar – was developed altogether

The last surviving colony of the runaway rails is still on the island.

A spokesman from Portsmouth said: “This is the first time iterative development – the repeated evolution of similar or parallel structures from the same ancestor but at different times – have been seen in rails and one of the most significant in bird posts. “

He explained that the railway is persistent colonizers that would migrate from Madagascar under frequent population explosions.

A group of colonized Aldabra atolls and because of the lack of predators such as Mauritius dodo, they developed in a way that they lost the ability to fly.

He explained: “Aldabra disappeared when it was completely covered by the sea during a major abundance event about 136,000 years ago, wiping out all the fauna and flora including the aviation railway.

” Scientists studied fossil evidence 100,000 years ago when marine life I fell during the subsequent ice age and the atoll was re-colonized by airless rails.

Vingeben fossils of flight (right) and flightless Dryolimna rails (University of Portsmouth / PA)

“The researchers compared the legs of a fossilized railway before the immigration event with bones from a railroad after the abundance event. [19659002] “They found that the wing bone showed an advanced state of flightlessness and the ankle bones showed clear features that it developed against the volatility.

“This means that a species from Madagascar gave rise to two different species of airless rail at Aldabra within a few thousand years.”

Dr Julian Hume, avian paleontologist at the Natural History Museum, said: “These unique fossils provide undeniable evidence that a member of the railway family colonized the atoll, probably from Madagascar, and became volatile independently at any time.

” Fossil Proof Presented here is unique to rails and reveals the ability of these birds to successfully colonize isolated islands and develop flightlessness on several occasions. “

Co-authors of the study published in the Linnaeus Society’s zoological journal, Professor David Martill – from the School of Soil and Environmental Sciences at the University of Portsmouth, said:” We do not know of any other example of rails or of birds in general, showing this phenomenon so obvious.

“Only at Aldabra, which has the oldest palaeontological record of any oceanic island in the Indian Ocean, are available as fossil evidence showing the effects of altered sea levels on extinction and recolonization events.

” Conditions were such at Aldabra, the most important was the lack of terrestrial predators and competing mammals, that a railroad could independently develop flightlessness at any time. “

– Press Association

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