Categories: world

E. coli outbreaks from minced meat beef expand to 10 states

Of those people so far infected, 20 of them have been hospitalized, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Tuesday. There have been no deaths.In the cases included people who have eaten the beef since March 1, but that is not said, but no supplier, distributor or brand of beef has been identified."Traceback surveys are underway to determine the source of colostrum delivered to grocery stores and restaurant areas where sick people reported eating," said the CDC.The diseases started from March 1 and the infected reaches of age from younger than 1 to 83, with a median age of 19, said it. "Diseases that occurred after March 26 may not be reported due to the time taken between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the disease is reported. It takes an average of two to three weeks," the CDC said. Earlier this month, the CDC said the identified beef food was responsible for an outbreak. At that time, it said that the outbreak involved 1 09 cases of disease in six states. The outbreak has now been extended to 10 states: Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, Indiana, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi, Minnesota. Symptoms include severe abdominal cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. They start on average three to four days after taking in the bacteria. Most recover within five to seven days. The first reported symptoms of this outbreak began on March 2. Consumers are encouraged to prevent the spread of E. coli by washing their hands, preparing beef…

Of those people so far infected, 20 of them have been hospitalized, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Tuesday. There have been no deaths.

In the cases included people who have eaten the beef since March 1, but that is not said, but no supplier, distributor or brand of beef has been identified.

“Traceback surveys are underway to determine the source of colostrum delivered to grocery stores and restaurant areas where sick people reported eating,” said the CDC.

The diseases started from March 1 and the infected reaches of age from younger than 1 to 83, with a median age of 19, said it.

“Diseases that occurred after March 26 may not be reported due to the time taken between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the disease is reported. It takes an average of two to three weeks,” the CDC said.

Earlier this month, the CDC said the identified beef food was responsible for an outbreak. At that time, it said that the outbreak involved 1

09 cases of disease in six states.

The outbreak has now been extended to 10 states: Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, Indiana, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi, Minnesota.

Symptoms include severe abdominal cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. They start on average three to four days after taking in the bacteria. Most recover within five to seven days. The first reported symptoms of this outbreak began on March 2.

Consumers are encouraged to prevent the spread of E. coli by washing their hands, preparing beef to an internal temperature of 160 degrees and keeping uncooked foods away from raw beef to prevent cross-contamination.

Share
Published by
Faela