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Do you need another vaccine against Measles?

Photo: Sean Gallup (Getty Images) We are on the right track for a record breaking fair season. Go USA! So far, the disease has basically been eliminated from the country in 2000, there have been some cases each year from outbreaks driven by travelers. As this year's fall bill rises above 600, you may be wondering: Can I rely on my child's measles vaccine? Did I my child's measles vaccine? Children should receive a shot of measles vaccine (delivered as MMR or measles-mumps rubella vaccine) shortly after turning one year. Some children's immune systems will not be completely clear at that age &#821 1; in which case the vaccine will not take so that everyone should get a booster shot around the time they start kindergarten. Why Your Old Vaccine May Not Be Good Enough Measles vaccine was first available in 1963, and for a few years there were two different vaccines. The version of live, attenuated measles virus is still used today. Another shot, with killed virus, was introduced around the same time but was canceled in 1967 as it was not as effective. If you have the less effective vaccine, the recommendation is to have a second dose, this time with the live vaccine. (It's possible that you got that extra shot when you were a kid.) In 1989, the CDC began recommending that even children who received the regular vaccine should still get a second shot – to remember that it doesn't work on all first time.…

Photo: Sean Gallup (Getty Images)

We are on the right track for a record breaking fair season. Go USA!

So far, the disease has basically been eliminated from the country in 2000, there have been some cases each year from outbreaks driven by travelers. As this year’s fall bill rises above 600, you may be wondering: Can I rely on my child’s measles vaccine? Did I my child’s measles vaccine?

Children should receive a shot of measles vaccine (delivered as MMR or measles-mumps rubella vaccine) shortly after turning one year. Some children’s immune systems will not be completely clear at that age &#821

1; in which case the vaccine will not take so that everyone should get a booster shot around the time they start kindergarten.

Why Your Old Vaccine May Not Be Good Enough

Measles vaccine was first available in 1963, and for a few years there were two different vaccines. The version of live, attenuated measles virus is still used today. Another shot, with killed virus, was introduced around the same time but was canceled in 1967 as it was not as effective.

If you have the less effective vaccine, the recommendation is to have a second dose, this time with the live vaccine. (It’s possible that you got that extra shot when you were a kid.)

In 1989, the CDC began recommending that even children who received the regular vaccine should still get a second shot – to remember that it doesn’t work on all first time. One dose is 93% effective; with both doses the efficiency goes up to 97%.

How to know if you need a new shot

As we have discussed before, you can always check your vaccination registers (if you find them) and, if you are unsure, ask your doctor for advice. In most cases, they will recommend the same thing as the CDC says, which is to make sure you have received at least one dose of the live vaccine, and in some cases they will recommend two. Here is the CDC breakdown:

You don’t need a vaccine if …

  • You know you’ve had messlor
  • You were born before 1957 (since all got measles
  • You have had a laboratory test showing that you are immune to measles.

If you know that you have had a dose of measles / MMR vaccine according to the schedule, it is enough if …

  • You is a preschooler (because you get the second dose around the time you start school)
  • You are an adult at risk of being exposed to measles

You should receive a second dose if:

  • You are an age child
  • You are an adult who travels, works in health care, goes to college or otherwise risks being exposed to measles [19659016] If you do not know your status, get the shot anyway. The CDC notes that there is no harm to get another dose of MMR, even if you are already immune to measles.

    The above advice applies are almost all, but there are some people who should not get the shot. If you are pregnant or if you or a family member has a weakened immune system due to an immune system or chemotherapy, the vaccine contains risks that may outweigh the benefits. (The CDC’s full list of contraindications is here.) However, do not assume that you are discussing the risks with your physician to find out what suits you.

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