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Difficult weather expectation of flooding, hail and dangerous winds: NPR

A vehicle is driven through floodwaters in downtown Jackson, Miss., On Thursday, as strong winds, tornado warnings and large rainfalls are added to the flash flood throughout the Mississippi. Rogelio V. Solis / AP hide caption change caption Rogelio V. Solis / AP A vehicle is driven through floodwaters in downtown Jackson, Miss., On Thursday, as strong winds, tornado warnings and large rainfalls are added to the flash across the Mississippi. Rogelio V. Solis / AP A new round of stormy storms is causing more flooding in several states, with parts of Deep South likely to be on the receiving end of some of the hardest weather at the end of the week that will affect about 40 million Americans. National Weather Service warned residents of southeast Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi to clean up a multiday block of dangerously heavy rain and flooding. The agency issued a flash flood watch for much of southeastern Texas and Louisiana on Thursday, to remain in force through Saturday night. Everywhere from 4 to 8 inches of precipitation is expected in the area, NWS said. On Tuesday, Houston Chronicle reported on surprising rainstorms "submerged streets and trained homes" in parts of Houston. The unexpected powerful rains also flooded schools and businesses, and stranded motorists and schoolchildren for hours. Overall, 10 inches of rain fell in some areas, which led to several high-water formulations by emergency services. The Red Cross establishes a shelter at a church northeast of Houston city center. While dry weather on…

A vehicle is driven through floodwaters in downtown Jackson, Miss., On Thursday, as strong winds, tornado warnings and large rainfalls are added to the flash flood throughout the Mississippi.

Rogelio V. Solis / AP

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Rogelio V. Solis / AP

A vehicle is driven through floodwaters in downtown Jackson, Miss., On Thursday, as strong winds, tornado warnings and large rainfalls are added to the flash across the Mississippi.

Rogelio V. Solis / AP

A new round of stormy storms is causing more flooding in several states, with parts of Deep South likely to be on the receiving end of some of the hardest weather at the end of the week that will affect about 40 million Americans.

National Weather Service warned residents of southeast Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi to clean up a multiday block of dangerously heavy rain and flooding.

The agency issued a flash flood watch for much of southeastern Texas and Louisiana on Thursday, to remain in force through Saturday night. Everywhere from 4 to 8 inches of precipitation is expected in the area, NWS said.

On Tuesday, Houston Chronicle reported on surprising rainstorms “submerged streets and trained homes” in parts of Houston. The unexpected powerful rains also flooded schools and businesses, and stranded motorists and schoolchildren for hours.

Overall, 10 inches of rain fell in some areas, which led to several high-water formulations by emergency services. The Red Cross establishes a shelter at a church northeast of Houston city center.

While dry weather on Wednesday released some areas, the Earth is still saturated. A large new storm system will cause the fallout to run fast and cause more flooding.

NWS said the moving storm can also cause harmful winds, large hail and short tornadoes.

Houston Public Media reports that can lead to “potential cresting on several regional rivers such as Brazos, San Jacinto, San Bernard and Trinity. The bayous will also need to be monitored.”

Holders in Pearl, Miss. , watch the morning blood river on Thursday. Strong winds, tornado warnings and large rainfall are added to the flash flooding across the Mississippi.

Rogelio V. Solis / AP

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Rogelio V. Solis / AP

Residents of Pearl, Miss., Watch the morning blood river on Thursday. Strong winds, tornado warnings and large rainfall are added to the flash across the Mississippi.

Rogelio V. Solis / AP

A twilight in Austin on Wednesday led to at least one mortality after a man believed to be in the 50s was swept away in the stream of raging floods, Austin-American statesman reported.

An NWS team is investigating injuries from a heavy storm that ripped through Arkansas Wednesday night, NPR’s KUAR reporter Michael Hibblen told reporters.

“The Pine Bluff police say four people were injured – one serious – after a violent storm pulled the roof from an apartment building,” said Hibblen, adding that about 150 people have been displaced.

After four violent storms across the region on Wednesday, Accuweather reported the risk that tornadoes were lower from Thursday. But “there is still the risk of some isolated tornadoes over land every day, as well as the possibility of a couple of water shoots near the Gulf Coast.”

Along the Mississippi River Valley, which has already endured more than a month at dangerous levels, reports more than 30 floodwaters flooding, Paula Cognitore, a hydrologist for the National Water Center, who told the NPR.

“The rain that soaked Missouri and Kansas earlier this week will work into the Missouri River connecting to the main tribe of Mississippi just north of St. Louis,” which will prolong major floods, said Cognitore.

In addition to Missouri, Kansas and Texas, Cognitore, South Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Mississippi have had major floods since March when snow melting began to enter watercourses.

She said that the added runoff has slowed down the river from falling back.

“The good news is that this part of the country – Great Plains and Upper Mississippi – should get a break from heavy rainfall next week or two,” added Cognitore.

Flooding, driven by climate change, becomes more frequent and difficult across the country, reported NPR’s Rebecca Hersher.

“In some parts of the Midwest and the East Coast, extreme rain has already increased more than 50% since the beginning of the 20th century,” says Hersher.

She explained warmer seawater is part of the problem and record high temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico work as An engine to make hurricanes bigger and wetter The resulting rainfall flows into rivers that were not designed to withstand current weather conditions. “Together, tens of billions of dollars for river trade and farmland are in danger. And more than $ 100 billion in real estate is threatened by rising seas, “Hersher noted.” Blows of widespread thunderstorms are expected across the Great Lakes region, Ohio and the Tennessee Valley and into the Lower Mississippi Valley and Southern Plains, NWS warned.

] Meanwhile, a full-fledged snowstorm is expected in the northeastern stretches of Minnesota and nearby northwestern Wisconsin.

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