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Democrats Weighing Alternatives In Potentially Tainted N.C. Congressional Race: NPR

Stacy Holcomb, 57, stands in front of his home in Bladenboro, NC, where he says he approached a woman during…

Stacy Holcomb, 57, stands in front of his home in Bladenboro, NC, where he says he approached a woman during the middle of the election and offered assistance in submitting an absentee vote, an event many in Bladen County said happened to them.

Washington Post / Getty Images

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Washington Post / Getty Images

Stacy Holcomb, 57, stands in front of his home in Bladenboro, NC where he says he approached a woman during the middle of the election and offered assistance in submitting an absentee vote, an event that many in Bladen County have said to them.

Washington Post / Getty Images

False fraud has been a discussed, rarely seen phenomenon in American elections in recent decades. But new details from governments and media investigations in the vote, which are counted in the North Carolina 9th Congressional District, paint a picture of a contest where any illegal voter fraud could have crooked the outcome in a tight race.

The North Carolina State Board of Elections has declined to certify the race where Republican Mark Harris leads the Democrat Dan McCready with about 900 votes in the unofficial tally. Instead, the board has begun investigating possible fraud in the district.

The Harris campaign confirmed to the NPR on Tuesday that it had received a day of action from the board this week. The campaign said that it examined the request.

Although some Republicans, including President Trump, have basically argued that personal fraud fraud is unreasonable, the survey of what may be the country’s most significant case of voting fraud this year centers on a voice-by-mail operation that seems to have become led by a man called Leslie McCrae Dowless.

The alleged plot

Dowless, a local political operative paid by a consultant hired by Harris, set up a “command center” in a commercial band gallery in Dublin, NC, according to a long report as published by Washington Post Monday.

Jeff Smith, the owner of the building, told Post that Dowless had a crew of about a dozen workers knocking on doors, got voters to request pending voting and then return to these homes and collect e-votes.

It is against the North Carolina Act for anyone other than a voter or voter “relative” to return an absentee vote in the state.

Smith’s story of events to Post matches what the voters told the NPR Member State WFAE:

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