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Cardinals have played dangerous games with Josh Rosen for a long time

Arizona Cardinal's quarterback Josh Rosen (3) beaten off Atlanta Falcon defensive end Bruce Irvin (52) during the second half of a NFL football match, Sunday, December 16, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo / Danny Karnik) "Three mistakes" are no longer his mantra. Three wins now define Josh Rosen. He is proof of talking is cheap in NFL, and the only thing that comes easy. He is proof that rookie quarterbacks are as good as the culture and coaches they inherit. The rose could not have been worse. The rose spent most of Sunday's 40-1 4 loss for Falcons in a state of agitation and forever harassment. He was mercifully lifted from the game late in the fourth quarter. He should be turned off for the season, with a pleasure to appreciate his moxie and pocket fashion. Rookie head coach Steve Wilks has done many uninspired things since he took over in Arizona. To leave the Roses on the field during the second half of Sunday's blowout loss, exposed to potential damage and the defense of a state hungry Falcon was the worst. The rose was under so much pressure that he ran back in his pocket twice against his own goal line. He flinched. He saw the ghosts. With another pick-six on Sunday he has now threw 10 touchdown passes for Cardinals and four for the second team. Most of this is not his fault. But Rosen hit the tip on Sunday. His frustration was obvious. Then his regression was.…

Arizona Cardinal’s quarterback Josh Rosen (3) beaten off Atlanta Falcon defensive end Bruce Irvin (52) during the second half of a NFL football match, Sunday, December 16, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo / Danny Karnik)

“Three mistakes” are no longer his mantra. Three wins now define Josh Rosen.

He is proof of talking is cheap in NFL, and the only thing that comes easy. He is proof that rookie quarterbacks are as good as the culture and coaches they inherit.

The rose could not have been worse.

The rose spent most of Sunday’s 40-1

4 loss for Falcons in a state of agitation and forever harassment. He was mercifully lifted from the game late in the fourth quarter. He should be turned off for the season, with a pleasure to appreciate his moxie and pocket fashion.

Rookie head coach Steve Wilks has done many uninspired things since he took over in Arizona. To leave the Roses on the field during the second half of Sunday’s blowout loss, exposed to potential damage and the defense of a state hungry Falcon was the worst.

The rose was under so much pressure that he ran back in his pocket twice against his own goal line. He flinched. He saw the ghosts. With another pick-six on Sunday he has now threw 10 touchdown passes for Cardinals and four for the second team. Most of this is not his fault.

But Rosen hit the tip on Sunday. His frustration was obvious. Then his regression was.

At a sideline outburst he threw his helmet to the ground and watched the bumped grass and into the hands of David Johnson. It was one of their cleanest endings of the season.

The temper of the rose was in stark contrast to how he started Week 15, showing up to work on Monday with Christmas wreaths and a menorah, a happy child full of holiday jubilee. Perhaps it was finally hit by him on Sunday.

This roadkill performance in Atlanta would seal the fate of Wilk in the valley. The foundation is a sludge. There is simply nothing to build on. Damage is a factor but not an alibi. You can not blame Mike McCoy or rookie offensive linemen for a defense ending Falcons.

You can not seem incompetent to a bad team where only one victory separated Cardinals and Falcons at the kickoff and the team seemed to be worlds apart.

Therefore nothing plays anything more than Rosen’s development, and the cardinals play a dangerous game with its most important asset. He should have been shut down before Sunday’s loss in Atlanta. He should watch the rest of the season while wearing a baseball cap, especially since Mike Glennon moved the team into junk time and gives an experience of the entire organization.

Instead, Wilks said that Rosen begins against Rams. Stupid idea. There is already a great deal of dissatisfaction that grows inside the fan base. Imagine if the rose goes down with serious harm, having to spend a significant offseason in rehabilitation. Or suffer an unpleasant brainwashing.

Of course, Rosen wants to continue playing. He values ​​his reputation as an unruly leader, durable and foldable in his pocket. Ducking out with two weeks left in the season would not help her reputation in the locker room. It would affect how football observers frame their rookie season, ending one day when he was deterred from the game in Atlanta. And it may not be easy for Rosen to see Baker Mayfield scolding in Cleveland or fail to prove he was the best rookie quarterback who entered the NFL.

But someone has to look at the big picture. The rose has been gifted a terrible offensive line, treated two offensive coordinators and a substandard set of wide recipients. It is one thing to remain untoward to chaos, which is Wilk’s greatest strength. But it is concise and courageous to believe that this experience helps Rosen.

Nevertheless, Wilks insists that Rosen needs to see more looks and covers. Besides all he sees are salivating defenders blowing hopeless linemen, who seem to pulverize a rookie quarterback. At this time, no good coming from this season, if you do not want to put Rosen with a fall of happy feet for the rest of his career.

The problem is that optics are important to the head coach and the general manager. I suppose one is safe and the other is gone after the season, but you never know in this business. And the pressure to win meaningless games and impress the owner can easily hide judged judgment.

The cardinals must go out of this season without further slits. It’s a season that should have ended for its rookie quarterback a while ago. And now they have to do what their offensive line can not do:

Protect the Rose from itself.

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Faela