Categories: world

Burial dentist patients should consider being tested for hepatitis, HIV, say health officials

State inspectors who responded to a complaint found infection control problems related to cleaning, disinfection, sterilization and storage of instruments. A dental clinic in Burien has been discontinued and former patients are advised to consider being tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV after state healthcare staff found that its staff were not the correct cleaning tool. The dental clinic George M. Davis, who has been in existence since 1982, was closed after a state inspection, according to a statement issued Tuesday from Public Health – Seattle & King County. State inspectors who responded to a complaint found problems with infection in connection with cleaning, disinfection, sterilization and storage of instruments. It is unlikely that patients met an infection, but public health calls them to talk with their health care provider about testing as a precautionary measure, said health officer Jeff Duchin. Infections from dental clinics are unusual, and officials are not aware of any infections caused by the clinic's methods, he added. Public health reviews all recent reported cases of hepatitis and is not aware of anyone who had an infection that was a patient at the clinic, said Duchin. Patients who had routines such as extraction or shot in the mouth have a higher risk, he says. "We believe the overall risk is low, but we also think that people should be aware of the infection control problems so that they can discuss testing with a healthcare provider," said Duchin. Dental Quality Assurance Commission, the State Dental…

State inspectors who responded to a complaint found infection control problems related to cleaning, disinfection, sterilization and storage of instruments.

A dental clinic in Burien has been discontinued and former patients are advised to consider being tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV after state healthcare staff found that its staff were not the correct cleaning tool.

The dental clinic George M. Davis, who has been in existence since 1982, was closed after a state inspection, according to a statement issued Tuesday from Public Health – Seattle & King County. State inspectors who responded to a complaint found problems with infection in connection with cleaning, disinfection, sterilization and storage of instruments.

It is unlikely that patients met an infection, but public health calls them to talk with their health care provider about testing as a precautionary measure, said health officer Jeff Duchin. Infections from dental clinics are unusual, and officials are not aware of any infections caused by the clinic’s methods, he added.

Public health reviews all recent reported cases of hepatitis and is not aware of anyone who had an infection that was a patient at the clinic, said Duchin. Patients who had routines such as extraction or shot in the mouth have a higher risk, he says.

“We believe the overall risk is low, but we also think that people should be aware of the infection control problems so that they can discuss testing with a healthcare provider,” said Duchin.

Dental Quality Assurance Commission, the State Dental Regulator, inspected the clinic on August 2. In addition to lack of cleaning goggles and appropriate disinfectants, a investigator found evidence that a dog may have spent time in the facility, eliminated products and lack of written infection control or exercise records, according to the Washington State Department of Health. Davis license on September 26th.

The state and county officials do not know who Davis patients were, because he did not respond to his attempts to contact him, said public health spokesman Meredith Li-Vollmer in an email. Government investigators could not decide how long infection control problems occurred but they think it may have gone back year, according to public health.

The four-month delay since the control to report patients was caused by a number of factors, said Li-Vollmer. The Agency became aware of the suspension of his license and the investigation on October 1

, and worked with the state to determine the risk for patients. Davis did not respond to the survey results or requested a hearing. Health officials tried to find alternative ways to inform patients, but they could not, she said.

Symptoms of hepatitis include abdominal pain, vomiting, jaundice and fatigue that persist for weeks or months, says the statement. Some people with hepatitis B, and most with hepatitis C, experience little or no symptoms, according to public health. Symptoms of HIV may include fever, swollen lymph nodes and flu-like illnesses, although some symptoms do not appear immediately.

Earlier patients who do not have access to care providers or are uninsured can contact public health for testing at 206-296-4949.

Share
Published by
Faela