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Bump Stocks Prohibited by Trump Administration: NPR

A "bump lager" is attached to a gun at Gun Vault store in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump Administration moves to ban bumps, which allows semi-automatic weapons to fire quickly. Rick Bowmer / AP hide caption change subtitle Rick Bowmer / AP A "bump lager" is attached to a gun at Gun Vault store in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump Administration moves to ban bans that allow semi-automatic weapons to burn fast. Rick Bowmer / AP The trumpet administration forbids bumpers, the firearm that allows a semi-automatic weapon to shoot almost as fast as a machine gun. The device, also known as gliding fires, came under intense review after being used by the shooter who opened fire at a country music concert in Las Vegas last year and killed 58 people. The massacre touched a public boast, including some legislators, for the accessories to be banned. Under a new federal rule announced Tuesday by the Justice Department, bump stocks will be redefined as "machine weapons" and therefore prohibited by applicable law. The new rules, signed by Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, will enter into force 90 days after publication in Federal Register . An official from the Justice Department said it was likely to happen Friday. Current bumpers will then have 90 days before the new rule enters into force to either destroy the units they own or turn them to the Bureau for Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The new rules can be met by legal challenges from the…

A “bump lager” is attached to a gun at Gun Vault store in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump Administration moves to ban bumps, which allows semi-automatic weapons to fire quickly.

Rick Bowmer / AP

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Rick Bowmer / AP

A “bump lager” is attached to a gun at Gun Vault store in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump Administration moves to ban bans that allow semi-automatic weapons to burn fast.

Rick Bowmer / AP

The trumpet administration forbids bumpers, the firearm that allows a semi-automatic weapon to shoot almost as fast as a machine gun.

The device, also known as gliding fires, came under intense review after being used by the shooter who opened fire at a country music concert in Las Vegas last year and killed 58 people.

The massacre touched a public boast, including some legislators, for the accessories to be banned.

Under a new federal rule announced Tuesday by the Justice Department, bump stocks will be redefined as “machine weapons” and therefore prohibited by applicable law.

The new rules, signed by Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, will enter into force 90 days after publication in Federal Register . An official from the Justice Department said it was likely to happen Friday.

Current bumpers will then have 90 days before the new rule enters into force to either destroy the units they own or turn them to the Bureau for Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The new rules can be met by legal challenges from the National Rifle Association, bump stock owner or manufacturer. An official in the Justice Department said the department is sure of its analysis and is prepared to defend the new rule in court if necessary.

Justice Department officials say they do not know exactly how many bump stocks are privately owned, but they estimate the number in tens of thousands.

Trump ordered the Justice Department to ban the units in March. The department followed up by proposing a federal rule change that would reclassify shock absorbers so that they fell under the definition of a “machine gun” as it does now.

Fully automated machine tools are strictly controlled in the United States. It is illegal under federal law for a private citizen to own a machine gun manufactured after 1986.

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