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Bug that causes relapsing fever identified in tick collected in Ireland

A bug that causes a rare form of relapsing fever has been identified in the tick in Ireland for the first time. The bug, a strain of Borrelia bacteria, was identified in a tick collected in Portumna, Co Galway The Borrelia miyamotoi pathogen, first identified in ticks from Japan in 1995, is distantly related to the bacteria that cause Lyme disease. The initial symptom of the illness is usually a red skin but left untreated, further symptoms can follow including a fever, muscle pain, joint swelling and temporary paralysis of the facial muscles. The find is reported in a Study published in the Plos One scientific journal by a team of Irish scientists, including researchers from University College Dublin and University College Cork. They say their research shows ticks in Ireland are infected by a variety of disease-carrying borrelia bacteria. The results also show Borrelia-infected ticks exist in the southeast, an area hitherto not considered to be significantly tick-infested and hence not considered an area of ​​risk to humans from Lyme disease. Infected ticks Five per cent or ticks collected for the study were found to be carrying infectious borrelia, with rates varying from 2 per cent in Killarney, Co Kerry, to 1 2 per cent in Portumna. All of the sampling sites, which also include Glenveagh, Co Donegal, Glendalough, Co Wicklow and Clifden, Co Galway, collected ticks infected with some form of Borrelia. year but patient say this is too low. The new study appears to indicate some ticks…

A bug that causes a rare form of relapsing fever has been identified in the tick in Ireland for the first time.

The bug, a strain of Borrelia bacteria, was identified in a tick collected in Portumna, Co Galway

The Borrelia miyamotoi pathogen, first identified in ticks from Japan in 1995, is distantly related to the bacteria that cause Lyme disease.

The initial symptom of the illness is usually a red skin but left untreated, further symptoms can follow including a fever, muscle pain, joint swelling and temporary paralysis of the facial muscles.

The find is reported in a Study published in the Plos One scientific journal by a team of Irish scientists, including researchers from University College Dublin and University College Cork.

They say their research shows ticks in Ireland are infected by a variety of disease-carrying borrelia bacteria. The results also show Borrelia-infected ticks exist in the southeast, an area hitherto not considered to be significantly tick-infested and hence not considered an area of ​​risk to humans from Lyme disease.

Infected ticks

Five per cent or ticks collected for the study were found to be carrying infectious borrelia, with rates varying from 2 per cent in Killarney, Co Kerry, to 1

2 per cent in Portumna. All of the sampling sites, which also include Glenveagh, Co Donegal, Glendalough, Co Wicklow and Clifden, Co Galway, collected ticks infected with some form of Borrelia.

year but patient say this is too low. The new study appears to indicate some ticks that could transmit another disease, which has similar symptoms to Lyme disease.

“It is likely that ticks have relapsing fever borrelia, they are biting humans, and maybe we are” missing “patients because No one is aware of relapsing fever in Ireland, and the current test does not pick up anyone with relapsing fever borreliosis, ”said Prof Jack Lambert, one of the authors of the study.

High fever

Tick-borne relapsing fever is characterized by a high fever that lasts for a few days, goes away for a week, and then comes back. Though rare, the disease is found in western states of the US and in parts of Spain

The disease normally goes away from itself, but severe cases are treated with antibiotics. from a tick bite is to take precautions when outdoors, such as wearing long trousers and tucking trouser legs into socks, and using tick repellents.

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