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Border Patrol: More families cross illegally to San Diego

TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) – The woman cried at first, squeezed her face down through a gap dug under the border.…

TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) – The woman cried at first, squeezed her face down through a gap dug under the border. The space is only a few inches high, and her feet kicked dust into the air as she waved. Then her 3 year old daughter wearing a pink sweat suit was pushed to California on her back and feet first by a man living in Mexico.

The mother urged them. Hurry, she said. “I’m here. It does not matter if you get dirty.”

Fifteen seconds later, the mother and daughter from Honduras were together in the United States. And soon an American border guard member arrived on a terrain vehicle to remove them in storage.

US Customs and Border Protection said Tuesday that the San Diego sector has experienced a “small blow up” in families entering the United States illegally and turns into agents since the caravan of American migrants arrived in Tijuana two weeks ago.

Thousands of immigrants on the Mexican side of the border live in crowded tent towns in Tijuana after a grisly weekend travel through Mexico on foot and hitching tours with the goal of applying for asylum in the United States Frustrated with the long wait to apply, with US treatment 100 Wishing every day, some immigrants try to cross the home.

Rachel Rivera, 19, told the Associated Press that Honduras had become insatiable. Momentum before she flung herself under the fence, she said that she glides through to the United States in an attempt to “give a better life” to her daughter Charlot.

An AP video journalist also witnessed more than two dozen migrants scale a fence between Mexico and the United States on Monday night. Once upon a time, the whole family raised their hands in front of border police agents who quickly arrived in white trucks.

It is unclear where the families were taken from there.

On a typical day before the caravan arrived in Tijuana, in the San Diego area, about 120 people detained crossing from Mexico.

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One day in the migrant caravan’s life in Mexico

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Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on its way to the United States , resting on the road when she goes to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico on October 25, 2018. Image taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on its way to the United States, on the way to Adonai, as they make their way to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino / Filfoto SEARCH “GLENDA ESCOBAR” FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH “WIDER IMAGE” FOR ALL STORIES. TPX PHOTOS OF THE DAY

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on his way to the United States, plays with his son Adonai in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico on October 28, 2018. The picture taken 28 October 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on his way to the United States, is living in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico on October 28, 2018. The picture taken on October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America heading to the United States poses for a photo with his children Adonai and Denzel in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Image taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan with thousands from Central America headed to the United States laughs as she lives in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Image taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America on their way to the United Kingdom, posing with their son Denzel, 8, as they live in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Image taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on its way to the United States, residing in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico on October 28, 2018. Image taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on his way to the United States, resting on his way to Deniji when they go to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico on October 25, 2018. Image taken on October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei M arcelino TPX PHOTOS ON THE DAY

Glenda Esc Obar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America, the road to the United States, prepares the sleeping area after arriving in a temporary camp with his sons Adonai and Denzel in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Image taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Denzel, 8, holds his brother Adonai, 5, close to her mother Glenda Escobar, an immigrant from Honduras, a part of a caravan of thousands of Central America under route to the United States when they go to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico on October 25, 2018. Image taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, a part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on their way to the United States, preparing the sleeping place after arriving in a preparatory camp with their sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexi ko October 28, 2018. Image taken on October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino [19659026] Glenda Esc Obar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America heading to the United States cries after speaking in phone, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Image taken on October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on their way to the United States , resting on the road, heading to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico on October 25, 2018. Image taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on its way to the United States poses on a photograph she lives in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Image taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, an immigrant from Hondu race, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America on their way to the United States, taking a vintage car with her children Adonai and Denzel as they go to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico on October 25, 2018. Image taken October 25, 2018 . REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Adonai, 5, son of Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America on his way to the United States, laughs when he is in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018 . Image taken on October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a Honduras migrant, part of a caravan of thousands of Central America heading to the United States, prepares the sleeping area after arriving at a temporary camp with his children Adonai and Denzel in Pijijiapan, Mexico on October 25, 2018. Image taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

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President Donald Trump issued a proclamation in November that revokes asylum rights for persons who attempt to cross the United States illegally. Rights groups question the legality of the proclamation.

U.S. Spokesman and Frontier Protection Spokesman Ralph DeSio said the United States was trying to deter illegal crossings by issuing the proclamation.

The USA has an established process for asylum seekers to present themselves in an “ordered” manner in a port where deSio says AP via email. “When people choose to ignore that process, they put themselves at risk and when it comes to families, they choose to risk their children’s lives.”

Trump went on Twitter again Tuesday to trump up support for a better border and argued that spending would be less than US due to illegal immigration each year because of illegal immigration.

People mostly from Honduras but also from El Salvador and Guatemala formed the caravan to Tijuana and sought safety in numbers while passing Mexico to avoid criminals and the charges required by the gangs exchanged on immigrants. Dozens of immigrants have told the AP that they are flying poverty and seeking a better life, while many also say about severe violence and death threats to the home.

Margarita Lopez, an immigrant from Honduras, said she would definitely jump on the fence to the United States if she got the chance. Meanwhile, Lopez was in line Tuesday to request a humanitarian visa from Mexican officials who would allow her to live and work in Mexico for a year.

When he stood nearby, Luis Fernando Vazquez, an immigrant from Guatemala, said he was winning. It is not so, he said.

___

Associated Presswriter Amy Guthrie of Mexico City and Elliot Spagat in San Diego contributed to this report.

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