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Ben revealed giant lottery tickets hunted by people in Argentina

Nearly 12,600 years ago, during the late Pleistocene era, a group of people chased and killed a gigantic slope in Argentina, then left the animal's legs behind, along with their slaughter knife. The giant pond's legs remained there, in a place called Campo Laborde in the Pampas region, until the year 2000, when a local farmer discovered them. Scientists recently redefined these fossils in the hope of better specifying when this particular was just killed. The sloth that these ancient people ate, whose scientific name is Megatherium americanum was 10 meters long and weighed more than 4 tons. It stood on two feet and was covered with shaggy hair. Although archaeologists know that people were once preyed on megamiles across America, the Campo Laborde discovery is the only confirmed earth sloth guy ever, according to the new study. A piece of the knife, or the Lithic tool, that people used to kill the giant castle at Campo Laborde. Gustavo Politis and Pablo Messineo The results also revealed that, contrary to what scientists previously thought, giant earth slips triggered at the end of the late Pleistocene, about 12,000 years ago. At that time, up to 90% of all large animals worldwide – including mastadons, prehistoric horses and ancient giant armadillos – erupted on all continents except Africa. Scientists who previously believed that giant earth slots could survive this extinction wave, but the new discovery picks it up. Instead, it seems Homo sapiens may have been one of the main reasons why…

Nearly 12,600 years ago, during the late Pleistocene era, a group of people chased and killed a gigantic slope in Argentina, then left the animal’s legs behind, along with their slaughter knife.

The giant pond’s legs remained there, in a place called Campo Laborde in the Pampas region, until the year 2000, when a local farmer discovered them. Scientists recently redefined these fossils in the hope of better specifying when this particular was just killed.

The sloth that these ancient people ate, whose scientific name is Megatherium americanum was 10 meters long and weighed more than 4 tons. It stood on two feet and was covered with shaggy hair.

Although archaeologists know that people were once preyed on megamiles across America, the Campo Laborde discovery is the only confirmed earth sloth guy ever, according to the new study.

A piece of the knife, or the Lithic tool, that people used to kill the giant castle at Campo Laborde. Gustavo Politis and Pablo Messineo

The results also revealed that, contrary to what scientists previously thought, giant earth slips triggered at the end of the late Pleistocene, about 12,000 years ago. At that time, up to 90% of all large animals worldwide – including mastadons, prehistoric horses and ancient giant armadillos – erupted on all continents except Africa.

Scientists who previously believed that giant earth slots could survive this extinction wave, but the new discovery picks it up.

Instead, it seems Homo sapiens may have been one of the main reasons why these large animals died.

Rewriting of gigantic castle history

After the sloth legs were found in 2000, the archaeologists examined the fossils and decided that they were between 9,700 and 6,750 years old, based on carbonation.

“In that case, we suspected that perhaps these early hunters had no impact on the extinction of the sloth,” Gustavo Politis, an archaeologist from the Universidad Nacional del Centro in Buenos Aires, and senior author of the new study, told Business Insider.

But since 2016 and 2017, Politis and his team returned their legs using a more sophisticated purification technique called XAD-2 resin, which separates the organic part of the bones (collagen) from the inorganic elements (fulvic acids), then dates each component separately.

The results led the researchers to revise their timeline: The legs were at least 1,000 years older than they originally thought and fixed this place of death in the Pleistocene era.

This extinct giant sloth could grow to more than 13 feet in height. Julie McMahon, Illinois University in Urbana-Champaign

Police said the consequences of the date change are huge. This means that the time period between the arrival of humans and the eradication of megamammers in this region of South America was only 2000 years. In other words, our ancestors managed to drive these giant earthquakes into extinction in just two millennia.

Read more: Divers found fossils of an old giant sloth hidden in a sink hole. The creature was 20 meters long.

The new results have also made Politis suspect that other gigantic veil of fossil sites have been dated incorrectly.

Homo sapiens were the new predators at the site

Although giant sloth fossils are abundant across South America, Campo Laborde is “the only place in the whole of America where we can see that the animal was hunted and killed there,” said police.

The archaeologists found evidence, including a broken piece of knife and other stone tools, that the people clearly chased and slaughtered the animal. According to the police, the team can even say that the knife that these hunters used to cut the meat had sharp, broken and thrown away.

” They removed the most valuable meat, then abandoned the carcass and left, “Politis said.

The gear his team found around the dead land valley was between 11,800 and 10,000 years old, confirming the site’s earlier date.

An artist’s reconstruction , based on newly discovered footprints, of prehistoric people in today’s New Mexico in search of a giant landslot. Alex McClelland / Bournemouth University

After people arrived in South America 14,500 years ago, they did quick work with many megamals living on the continent. Homo sapiens also chased the mastadons and giant armadillo relatives called glyptodones.

If this new slaughter date is correct, it is likely that ancient people contributed to the rapid eradication of the animals, as well as that of the giant slope, Politis said.

“This is a window in the past,” he said. “We can somehow reconstruct the actions that people performed 12 600 years ago.”

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