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Bedtime protein for bigger profits? Here's the bucket

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Drinking a caseinake just before night increases increases in muscle mass and strength in response to exercise exercise. But to date, no study has directly addressed whether this effect is due to increased total protein intake alone, or if a bedtime drink is better. According to a review published in Frontiers in Nutrition existing findings suggest that sleep at night is a unique nutrient window to increase muscle gains while protein calories at the end of the night do not need to increase body fat. 1 9659005] Casein point: Snijders' seminal study "Several one-night studies have shown that protein intake before sleep increases muscle print synthesis during sleep in young adults", says lead author Dr. Tim Snijders, assistant professor at Maastricht University. "These have suppressed the idea that for a long period a protein-based supplement can maximize the strength and muscle mass during regular exercise exercises." Snijders 2015 study is the most compelling demonstration so far for this. His team put 44 healthy young men on a 12 week lifting program. Half received a nocturnal protein shake with about 30g of casein and 15 grams of carbohydrates, while the other half received an energy-free drink. The training was effective – both groups ended up with a larger squat (one rep max) and larger quads but the group for the protein pre-bed got significantly more muscle strength and size. Is protein consumption before sleep better? But are muscle gains reinforced with sleep protein in itself or just…

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Drinking a caseinake just before night increases increases in muscle mass and strength in response to exercise exercise. But to date, no study has directly addressed whether this effect is due to increased total protein intake alone, or if a bedtime drink is better.

According to a review published in Frontiers in Nutrition existing findings suggest that sleep at night is a unique nutrient window to increase muscle gains while protein calories at the end of the night do not need to increase body fat. 1

9659005] Casein point: Snijders’ seminal study

“Several one-night studies have shown that protein intake before sleep increases muscle print synthesis during sleep in young adults”, says lead author Dr. Tim Snijders, assistant professor at Maastricht University. “These have suppressed the idea that for a long period a protein-based supplement can maximize the strength and muscle mass during regular exercise exercises.”

Snijders 2015 study is the most compelling demonstration so far for this.

His team put 44 healthy young men on a 12 week lifting program. Half received a nocturnal protein shake with about 30g of casein and 15 grams of carbohydrates, while the other half received an energy-free drink.

The training was effective – both groups ended up with a larger squat (one rep max) and larger quads but the group for the protein pre-bed got significantly more muscle strength and size.

Is protein consumption before sleep better?

But are muscle gains reinforced with sleep protein in itself or just higher total intake of protein and calories?

Only one study has attempted to fail – to test this issue. It showed that fat-free mass gain over 8 weeks of unchanged exercise in regular lifts was greater (+1.2 kg vs. +0.4 kg) with a nocturnal casein supplement compared to the same supplement taken in the morning. The difference was not statistically significant, but perhaps because there were only 26 participants.

“Based on our own studies, we calculated that a large number of participants would be needed to prove whether a difference could exist in response to pre-sleep protein, compared to protein intake at other times of the day,” Snijders explains.

However, there are already many indirect indicators that pre-sleep protein is especially useful for healthy young lifters.

Sleep is a unique opportunity for muscle recovery and growth

Basically, pre-sleep protein can be used to improve the distribution of protein intake during the day, Snijders says.

The muscles can only grow and repair themselves when the right building blocks-amino acids from protein are available in the blood. However, in contrast to blood sugar, the body does not store and release amino acids to maintain near constant circulatory levels.

“A survey of over 500 athletes found that they generally consume more than 1.2 g of protein per kilogram of body weight over three main meals, but only a narrow 7g of protein as an evening meal. As a result, lower amino acids would be available for muscle growth during sleep overnight. “

But if protein consumption before sleep allows muscles to squeeze in more amino acids at night, will they only use less during the day? Probably not, claims Snijders.

“The muscle building effects of protein supplements at each meal seem to be additive. In one study, we found that the consumption of abundant protein (60g whey) prior to night’s sleep did not change the synthetic response to muscle protein the following morning.

” In addition, others have shown The addition of a protein supplement at bedtime does not affect the appetite the following morning – so it is unlikely to compromise on the total protein or calorie intake. “

Bedtime Protein Will Not” Make You Thick “or Destroy Your Sleep

Although the case of pre-sleep protein remains tentative, there is no harm in trying it? It’s after all, consuming calories just before a long period of inactivity.

The evidence is sparse but encouraging.

“In the 8-week morning vs. evening-case study, the extra consumption of protein calories did not result in an increase in fat mass despite the fact that the training volume did not change,” Snijders reports. these results should be interpreted with caution because of the low number of volunteers included.

“To support this, another group found in 11 young active men as a pre-sleep casein shake actually increased fat burning the next day. This may be because casein intake reduces the insulin response to subsequent meals, pushing your body to use more fat. “

Due to the results of these studies, not least protein consumption, especially casein, is shown before bed. to “make you thick.” In fact, it seems to actually increase fat metabolism.

Finally, sleep protein can be what keeps Snijders up at night – but it won’t stop you from getting your well-deserved rest.

“It has been consistently shown that ingestion of sleep proteins has no effect on sleep delay or sleep quality.”

In conclusion: We do not yet have conclusive evidence that you add pre-sleep protein consumption to your exercise regimen: but it is worth it a try -And it’s worth more research.


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More information :
Tim Snijders et al., Influence of Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion on Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Human Exercise: An Update, Limits in Nutrition (2019). DOI: 10.3389 / fnut.2019.00017


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Bedtime protein for bigger profits? Here’s the scoop (2019, March 6)
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