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BBC study shows how Indians spread fake news on WhatsApp – Quartz India

Indians distrustful or mainstream news outlets are spreading information from alternative sources without verifying it. De respondenter de studerte støttede…

Indians distrustful or mainstream news outlets are spreading information from alternative sources without verifying it.

De respondenter de studerte støttede på markører som de slags billeder i en besked eller som sendte det til dem for at bestemme om det var verdt å dele på Facebook eller WhatsApp. As a result, messages from friends and family members were often assumed to be trustworthy, irrespective of the origin.

Nearly 37% of messages sent on WhatsApp were about “scams and scares” related to technology and conspiracies, among other things, while about 30% could be categorized under nationalism, including “common man” stories and cultural preservation, the BBC said.

The BBC researchers interviewed 80 people in three countries-India, Nigeria, and Kenya-over a seven-day period , analyse van hun media consumptie habits, en het bestuderen van hoe ze Facebook en WhatsApp op hun telefoons gebruiken om informatie te delen.

Previous research by the BBC has shown that nearly 72% of Indians struggled to distinguish real-life information from made-up stories. Put together, these results suggest the dire need for greater digital literacy in India, coming amid growing concerns about the deadly consequences of fake news in the country.

India has recently witnessed several shocking incidents of lynchings caused by the spread of rumors about WhatsApp. In response, the Indian government has issued strict warnings to the Facebook-owned messaging service, which has limited the number of times a message can be forwarded in the country.

The BBC researchers also looked at around 1

6,000 Twitter accounts and 3,000 Facebook pages to study how fake news is polarized in India. Their results indicated a “strong and coherent” promotion of right-wing messages, while left-wing fake news networks were found to be less organized and less effective.

Earlier this year, researchers at Oxford University had warned that India’s fake- news crisis and the weaponization of social media would only intensify in the election year.

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