Categories: world

At this rate, women will not have economic equality with men in 202 years, says the report

Breaking News Emails Get deleted news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered everyday mornings. SUBSCRIBE Dec. 18, 2018 / 19:39 PM GMT By Minyvonne Burke It will take more than 200 years before women and men across the world have economic equality, according to the annual global gender report released Tuesday of the world Economic forum. The report found that the economic gap &#821 1; based on pay, participation and progress in the workplace – has been closed with only a small amount since the 2017 survey. For single-pay, women continue to earn about 20 percent less on average than men, according to the International Labor Organization's results mentioned in the report. One factor that keeps women back is that they are underrepresented in senior positions, says the report. "At work, women still face significant obstacles in taking on leading or higher official roles," read the report, saying that it will take 202 years for the economic gap to close. The United States is 19th out of 149 countries on economic equality between women and men. It lies behind Iceland, Norway and Finland, but in front of Germany, France and Denmark. The countries with the largest economic parity are smaller countries: Laos is number one and Barbados number two. The report also saw gaps in other areas – including health, education and politics – and found that the gap between all areas was closed somewhat this year. The United States overall ranked 51th equality. Iceland…

Breaking News Emails

Get deleted news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered everyday mornings.

By Minyvonne Burke

It will take more than 200 years before women and men across the world have economic equality, according to the annual global gender report released Tuesday of the world Economic forum.

The report found that the economic gap &#821

1; based on pay, participation and progress in the workplace – has been closed with only a small amount since the 2017 survey.

For single-pay, women continue to earn about 20 percent less on average than men, according to the International Labor Organization’s results mentioned in the report.

One factor that keeps women back is that they are underrepresented in senior positions, says the report.

“At work, women still face significant obstacles in taking on leading or higher official roles,” read the report, saying that it will take 202 years for the economic gap to close.

The United States is 19th out of 149 countries on economic equality between women and men. It lies behind Iceland, Norway and Finland, but in front of Germany, France and Denmark.

The countries with the largest economic parity are smaller countries: Laos is number one and Barbados number two.

The report also saw gaps in other areas – including health, education and politics – and found that the gap between all areas was closed somewhat this year.

The United States overall ranked 51th equality. Iceland was ranked number one for the 10th consecutive year, and Yemen’s war center was the last.

The area with the biggest gap between men and women is in politics, reports the report.

“Only 23% of the political divide – unchanged since last year – has closed, and no country has yet closed the political empowerment gap”, according to the report, which compared the number of political offices held by women and men.

Share
Published by
Faela