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At least 156 people in 10 states who are sick of E. coli linked to minced meat, says CDC

April 24, 2019 Health 0 Views ATLANTA – Investigators believe that beef may be guilty after 156 people in 10 states have contracted E. coli since March 1, said disease control centers and preventive Tuesday. The CDC is trying to track the cases involving people who eat beef at home and in restaurants, to their source. No supplier, distributor or brand of beef has been identified. No deaths have been reported, but 20 people have been hospitalized for treatment. The majority of cases occurred in Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia, but consumers also became nausea in Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio and Virginia. People who eat Shiga toxin-producing E. coli usually begin to get sick about three to four days later and can experience severe stomach cramps, diarrhea &#821 1; often bloody – and vomiting. It usually lasts for five to seven days, but can be life-threatening in some cases. The CDC said Tuesday that they do not recommend people stop eating or buying beef, but urge consumers to make sure that the meat CDC continues to investigate and will provide updates as they become available. See the CDC website for more information on E. coli, how to safely prepare meat and updates on the investigation. 33.748995-84.387982 [19659011] Source link

ATLANTA – Investigators believe that beef may be guilty after 156 people in 10 states have contracted E. coli since March 1, said disease control centers and preventive Tuesday.

The CDC is trying to track the cases involving people who eat beef at home and in restaurants, to their source. No supplier, distributor or brand of beef has been identified.

No deaths have been reported, but 20 people have been hospitalized for treatment.

The majority of cases occurred in Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia, but consumers also became nausea in Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio and Virginia.

People who eat Shiga toxin-producing E. coli usually begin to get sick about three to four days later and can experience severe stomach cramps, diarrhea &#821

1; often bloody – and vomiting. It usually lasts for five to seven days, but can be life-threatening in some cases.

The CDC said Tuesday that they do not recommend people stop eating or buying beef, but urge consumers to make sure that the meat

CDC continues to investigate and will provide updates as they become available.

See the CDC website for more information on E. coli, how to safely prepare meat and updates on the investigation.

33.748995
-84.387982 [19659011]
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