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Astronomers discover a young star that forms the same way the planets are born

A group of astronomers led by Dr. John Ilee of the University of Leeds has discovered a young star that forms a planet. Astronomers observed a young massive star, known as MM 1a, and the rotating disc of gas and dust around MM 1 a when they found a weak baby star, MM 1b, MM 1a circled. The result was made using the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array (ALMA) located in the Chilean desert. Astronomers used the interferometry process to combine the power into 66 separate disks of ALMA. That way they could observe the material surrounding both stars for the first time. In an unusual observation, researchers found that the rotating disc around MM 1a was "fragmented" and MM 1b was placed beyond this disc. 19659004] Stars are formed within the large clouds of dust and gas in interstellar space. When these big clouds collapse under gravity, they start rotating faster and eventually create a disc around them. "In low-mass stars like our Sun, it is in these discs that planets can form. In this case, the star and the disc we have observed are so massive that, instead of witnessing a plane formed in the disc, we see that another star is born, "says Dr Ilee, from Physics and Astronomy in Leeds. The team also calculated the mass of both stars and found that the mass of MM 1b is less than half of our Sun's mass. In contrast, the mass of MM 1a is about 40…

A group of astronomers led by Dr. John Ilee of the University of Leeds has discovered a young star that forms a planet.

Astronomers observed a young massive star, known as MM 1a, and the rotating disc of gas and dust around MM 1

a when they found a weak baby star, MM 1b, MM 1a circled.

The result was made using the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array (ALMA) located in the Chilean desert. Astronomers used the interferometry process to combine the power into 66 separate disks of ALMA. That way they could observe the material surrounding both stars for the first time.

In an unusual observation, researchers found that the rotating disc around MM 1a was “fragmented” and MM 1b was placed beyond this disc. 19659004] Stars are formed within the large clouds of dust and gas in interstellar space. When these big clouds collapse under gravity, they start rotating faster and eventually create a disc around them.

“In low-mass stars like our Sun, it is in these discs that planets can form. In this case, the star and the disc we have observed are so massive that, instead of witnessing a plane formed in the disc, we see that another star is born, “says Dr Ilee, from Physics and Astronomy in Leeds.

The team also calculated the mass of both stars and found that the mass of MM 1b is less than half of our Sun’s mass. In contrast, the mass of MM 1a is about 40 times the mass of our Sun, which means that the binary star system has a mass ratio of 80: 1.

Dr. Ilee reveals that many older massive stars with a companion have been discovered earlier. But these stars were found to have almost the same mass as their companions, which indicates that both stars probably came together as siblings.

“Finding a young binary system with a mass ratio of 80: 1 is very unusual, and proposes a completely different formation process for both objects,” said Dr. Ilee.

The team believes that MM 1b could also be surrounded by its own circumstellar disc with the potential to create its own planets.

study published in Astrophysical Journal Letters .

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