Categories: world

Are avocados and almonds vegan? Here's why some say no

Commercial farming of these vegetables, at least in some parts of the world, often involves migratory beekeeping. In places like California, there are not enough local bees or other pollinating insects to pollinate the massive almond gardens. Hives are transported on the back of large trucks between the farms – they can go from almond farms in a part of the US and then to avocado farms in another, and later to sunflower fields in time for the summer. Vegans Avoid Animal Products. For strict vegans, this means avoiding honey because of the use of bees. It seems to mean that vegans should also avoid vegetables such as avocados that involve bees being used in their production. Defense of avocados The revelation that avocados may not be "vegan-friendly" may seem to be a reductio ad absurdum of the ethical vegan argument. Some people may point this out and argue that those who are vegans but still consume avocados (or almonds and the like) are hypocrites. Alternatively, this type of news can lead to some people throwing their hands on the impossibility of living a truly vegan diet, and so giving up. Fit me on foie gras someone … But a first defense for vegans is that this is just a problem for some vegetables produced commercially on a large scale and which is dependent on migrant beekeeping. In places like the UK, this practice is still (as far as I can tell) unusual. Locally produced butternut squash would probably be…

Commercial farming of these vegetables, at least in some parts of the world, often involves migratory beekeeping. In places like California, there are not enough local bees or other pollinating insects to pollinate the massive almond gardens. Hives are transported on the back of large trucks between the farms – they can go from almond farms in a part of the US and then to avocado farms in another, and later to sunflower fields in time for the summer.

Vegans Avoid Animal Products. For strict vegans, this means avoiding honey because of the use of bees. It seems to mean that vegans should also avoid vegetables such as avocados that involve bees being used in their production.

Defense of avocados

The revelation that avocados may not be “vegan-friendly” may seem to be a reductio ad absurdum of the ethical vegan argument. Some people may point this out and argue that those who are vegans but still consume avocados (or almonds and the like) are hypocrites. Alternatively, this type of news can lead to some people throwing their hands on the impossibility of living a truly vegan diet, and so giving up. Fit me on foie gras someone …

 Vegganism: Why Some Vegans Eat Eggs

But a first defense for vegans is that this is just a problem for some vegetables produced commercially on a large scale and which is dependent on migrant beekeeping. In places like the UK, this practice is still (as far as I can tell) unusual. Locally produced butternut squash would probably be good (although you could never guarantee that a bee kept in a beehive had not pollinated a crop), while avocados and almonds (including plain milk) coming from California might be a problem.

high-performance vegan competence: New research shows that it is possible

Another answer may be due to someone’s view of the moral status of the insects. Commercial beekeeping can damage or kill bees. Transporting bees to pollinate crops seems to negatively affect their health and longevity. But some may question whether bees are able to suffer in the same way as animals, while others may wonder if bees are self-conscious – whether they have a desire to live. If they do not, some philosophers claim that they would not be harmed by being killed (others, such as Gary Francione, would ask to divorce).

Depends on your ethical background

The most important general answer is that or not migrating beekeeping is a problem due to your ethical basis for being vegan.

Some vegans have a non-consequential motivation for being vegan – they want to avoid acting immorally through their diet. This can be based on something that the Kantian rule avoids using another sentient as a means to an end. Or they may have a rights-based view, according to which animals (including bees) are rights holders. A possible amount of violation of rights is wrong according to this view – it is simply not ethically allowed to use bees as slaves.

 Change Your Diet To Combat Climate Change 2019

Other vegans choose not to eat meat or other animal products for succession – they want to minimize animal suffering and killing. This ethical argument may also have problems with migrant beekeeping. While the amount of suffering experienced by a single bee is probably small, this would be magnified by the very large number of potentially affected insects (31 billion honeybeds in the individual Californian almond plants). A vegan who chooses to eat almonds or avocados does not do what would most reduce animal suffering.

Another (perhaps more practical) ethical motivation that can form the basis for a decision to go vegan is the desire to reduce the animal’s suffering and killing and environmental impact involved in food production. Migrant beekeeping also has negative environmental impacts, for example by spreading disease and effect on indigenous honeycomb populations.

Vegan diets add malnutrition in rich countries

With this view, dietary habits that reduce animal utilization are still valuable even though some animal utilization would still occur. After all, it is necessary to draw a line somewhere. When we make choices about our diet, we need to balance the effort we consume against the influence on our daily life. The same applies when we make choices about how much we should donate to charity, or how much work we should do to reduce water consumption, energy use or CO₂ emissions.

An ethical theory of how resources are to be distributed is sometimes called “sufficientarianism”. In short, the idea is that resources should be distributed in a way that is not quite the same and may not maximize happiness, but at least guarantees that everyone has a basic minimum – have enough. At another ethics area, the discussion is sometimes discussed that the purpose of parenting is not the perfect parent (we all fail), but to be a “good enough” parent.

Taking a similar “sufficient” approach to ethics to avoid animal products does not aim to be completely vegan or maximum vegan, without being vegan enough – to make as much effort as possible to reduce animal injuries for spring diet’s reason – we can call this a “vegan” diet. For some people this may mean choosing to avoid Californian avocados, but others may find their personal ethical balance at another point. What’s more, accepting and embracing all of these variations can allow more people to adopt or maintain a vegan lifestyle.

Fit me to toast, somebody.

Dominic Wilkinson is a consultant nonatologist and professor of ethics at the University of Oxford. He receives funding from the Wellcome Trust.


Source link

Share
Published by
Faela