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Arctic change has widespread impact

The light reflects the Icelandic ice. Credit: NASAWhen Arctic warms faster than the rest of the world, the Icelandic and Icelandic ice and sea ice disappear at unprecedented prices. And these changes not only affect the Arctic infrastructure, economies and cultures, they also have significant effects elsewhere, according to a comment in Earth's Future led by researchers Twila Moon of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at University of Colorado Boulder. "For many, the Arctic seems like a remote universe &#821 1; one that can never affect their lives," Moon said. "But the reality is that changes in the Arctic are increasingly affecting the rest of the world, causing enhanced climate change, sea level elevation, coastal flooding and more devastating storms." Sea Level Rise Melting of land ice has contributed to 60 percent of sea level rise since 1972. The Icelandic ice covers over two million hectares of acres, and studies have confirmed that this area is rapidly decreasing due to climate change. In addition, most awnings in this region decrease. If current heating paths are maintained, Arctic awnings are expected to be a major contributor to the forecast global sea level rise, contributing to one meter in this century. Three out of four of America's largest cities, New York, Los Angeles, and Houston, are coastal and 39 percent of American people live in shorelines. As sea levels continue to rise, coastal cities around the US and the world will be forced to deal with the effects, including…



The light reflects the Icelandic ice. Credit: NASA

When Arctic warms faster than the rest of the world, the Icelandic and Icelandic ice and sea ice disappear at unprecedented prices. And these changes not only affect the Arctic infrastructure, economies and cultures, they also have significant effects elsewhere, according to a comment in Earth’s Future led by researchers Twila Moon of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at University of Colorado Boulder.

“For many, the Arctic seems like a remote universe &#821

1; one that can never affect their lives,” Moon said. “But the reality is that changes in the Arctic are increasingly affecting the rest of the world, causing enhanced climate change, sea level elevation, coastal flooding and more devastating storms.”

Sea Level Rise

Melting of land ice has contributed to 60 percent of sea level rise since 1972. The Icelandic ice covers over two million hectares of acres, and studies have confirmed that this area is rapidly decreasing due to climate change. In addition, most awnings in this region decrease. If current heating paths are maintained, Arctic awnings are expected to be a major contributor to the forecast global sea level rise, contributing to one meter in this century. Three out of four of America’s largest cities, New York, Los Angeles, and Houston, are coastal and 39 percent of American people live in shorelines. As sea levels continue to rise, coastal cities around the US and the world will be forced to deal with the effects, including flooding, freshwater pollution, coastal erosion, higher storm surges, and more.

Extreme Weather Events

In addition to the increased storm disturbances and flood events caused by the sea level rise, it is apparent from a current hypothesis that changes in the Arctic beam current can affect storms and extreme weather events, including snow storms and droughts, in continental US and Canada , Europe and Asia.

Infrastructure damage

According to the scenario “Business as usual”, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (RCP8.5) estimates that Alaska will face $ 5.5 billion in infrastructure damage between 2015 and 2099. Almost half of this will depend directly on permafrost is stretched. In addition, this permafrost thaw will release significant amounts of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere, contributing to further heating of the planet.

Coastal leveling and arctic reinforcement

Sea extension and sea ice thickness have both been reduced for over several decades. This isis loss has caused dramatic coastal erosion in Siberia and Alaska and has serious global consequences, since sea ice helps regulate the Earth’s climate by reflecting incoming solar radiation. As the sea protection drops, arctic warming is enhanced by these reductions in surface reflectivity.

Looking Forward

“As the Arctic continues to warm faster than the rest of the world, we continue to see effects globally, including in tropical and temperate countries with large cities, large economies, and lots of infrastructure,” says Moon. “If we want to protect our people and society, we must act now to both reduce emissions to limit warming and prepare for the inevitable changes that have already been made.”


Explore further:
Exploring permafrost coastal erosion in the Arctic

More information:
Twila A. Moon et al. The growing footprint of rapid Arctic change, The Future of Earth (2019). DOI: 10,1029 / 2018EF001088

Provided by:
University of Colorado at Boulder

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