Categories: world

Apple seems to soften its repair policies

Photo: nicely (Pixabay) Several outlets report that Apple has changed its policy for repairs to iPhones with third-party compensation. These reports say Apple will now fix iPhones even if the device has a non-Apple battery inside. And since batteries are perhaps the most important repair of a mobile device, this is a big thing, not just for iPhone owners but also for the broader right-to-repair business. Earlier this week, the French technical site iGeneration was the first to identify changes in Apple's repair policy, which it says will enter into force on February 28. Referring to "an internal document obtained … from three reliable sources", MacRumors confirmed the report as well as the details of it. Both outlets say Apple has introduced a new policy where iPhone owners with third-party batteries will be able to repair at Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers (AASP). Previously, technicians have been told to reject service on iPhones with non-Apple batteries. If the reports are correct, iPhone owners with third party batteries can now take their devices to the Genius Bar or an AASP and repair other components (such as the display, logic card, microphone or camera). If it is a battery-related repair, Apple or the authorized technology will replace the third-party battery with an Apple. The technician would also have the power to replace the entire phone with broken or missing battery tabs being broken or missing or if there is too much glue. In other words, it appears that Apple will…

Photo: nicely (Pixabay)

Several outlets report that Apple has changed its policy for repairs to iPhones with third-party compensation. These reports say Apple will now fix iPhones even if the device has a non-Apple battery inside. And since batteries are perhaps the most important repair of a mobile device, this is a big thing, not just for iPhone owners but also for the broader right-to-repair business.

Earlier this week, the French technical site iGeneration was the first to identify changes in Apple’s repair policy, which it says will enter into force on February 28. Referring to “an internal document obtained … from three reliable sources”, MacRumors confirmed the report as well as the details of it. Both outlets say Apple has introduced a new policy where iPhone owners with third-party batteries will be able to repair at Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers (AASP). Previously, technicians have been told to reject service on iPhones with non-Apple batteries.

If the reports are correct, iPhone owners with third party batteries can now take their devices to the Genius Bar or an AASP and repair other components (such as the display, logic card, microphone or camera). If it is a battery-related repair, Apple or the authorized technology will replace the third-party battery with an Apple. The technician would also have the power to replace the entire phone with broken or missing battery tabs being broken or missing or if there is too much glue. In other words, it appears that Apple will still repair your device if you have a careless repair job from a third party.

It’s hard to know exactly what Apple’s obviously improved repair policy means because we still don’t know all the details. We handed out to Apple to confirm the previous reports and will update when we hear back.

Meanwhile, a call with Apple Support has suggested that some changes had been made. The representative said Apple recently changed a policy that would allow the Genius Bar or an AASP to replace third-party batteries for out-of-warranty devices. The repairer also said that a screen repair on an iPhone with a third-party battery “would be up to the technology that inspects it.” Probably a technician would not want to work on a phone that contained a battery that looked like it could explode. Some have suggested that security and security are reasons why Apple does not want to repair iPhones with third-party batteries.

However, there is a larger picture. Even a little bit of movement on the Apple repair front has to be quite exciting for people’s right-to-repair activists who have been struggling for years for small policy changes like the reported third-party battery. First of all, if this battery magazine is true, it would represent another great concession that Apple made in the broader struggle to give consumers greater control over their devices. It was two years ago that the company said third-party exchange screens would no longer cancel iPhone warranties, which was a big deal for the clumsy screen.

But batteries are almost a major deal, as they are inherently subject to degradation and ultimately failure over time. Apple, quite embarrassing, made this fact clear when it secretly strangled older iPhones to prevent their aging batteries from causing unexpected shutdowns. After a few weeks of controversy, the company decided to slam the price of replacement batteries from $ 79 to $ 29 for some iPhones, but some customers had to pay for more expensive repairs before they got cheap battery replacement. All this very public drama pointed out that iPhone batteries do not last forever, and it is safe to assume that this made more people think about changing batteries.

This asks for the question of whether Apple wants people to replace the batteries. Apple has acknowledged that these cheap battery changes are settling on iPhone sales, so you’d think the company would like to keep a policy that discouraged battery products that didn’t put money into Apple’s pocket. But the new repair policy &#821

1; if the reports are true – would give iPhone users more options for cheaper replacements with fewer consequences, which in turn would discourage people from buying iPhones even more. What is it about?

Here’s an absurd hypothesis: maybe Apple actually listens to its customers. The explosion of third-party options is proof that people want choices when it comes to repairing their devices. So maybe Apple is trying to give iPhone users a better overall experience, one that does not shrink them into repair options so unpleasant that they might consider killing iPhones altogether and getting one of the sick new triple cameras Samsung phones. Perhaps Apple is looking down into the barrel of an uncertain future and doing what it can to stay as rich as possible.

Share
Published by
Faela