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Apple claims it doesn't scan customers' faces after youth sucks $ 1 billion

Apple is accused of using face recognition software in its Apple Stores to arrest the wrong person for theft – a New York student now suing Apple for $ 1 billion. And while Apple says The Verge it does not use facial recognition technology in its stores, the case is strange enough, and there is enough wiggle room, it is not clear if it is the whole truth. Ousmane Bah, 18, claims in a trial that he was mistakenly identified as a robber in several Apple Store thefts over several states, but denies that he is the person in the picture who followed the delay in his arrest. The background of surveillance films and testimonies of a detective, district attorneys in New York and Boston have already dropped the charges against Bah, the trial says. (He is still accused of larceny in New Jersey in an ongoing case, according to the document.) A NYPD detective first noticed Bah "saw nothing like" video suspect According to the lawsuit, NYPD detective John Reinhold first noticed that Bah "did not look like" it suspected in the surveillance video of a Manhattan Apple Store being robbed. According to the trial, the detective then explained that Apple's security technology identifies theft suspects using face detection technology. When we arrived at Reinhold on the phone to comment, he agreed that Apple did not technically have facial recognition in their stores, but also that his statements described in the trial were accurate. He refused to answer further…

Apple is accused of using face recognition software in its Apple Stores to arrest the wrong person for theft – a New York student now suing Apple for $ 1 billion. And while Apple says The Verge it does not use facial recognition technology in its stores, the case is strange enough, and there is enough wiggle room, it is not clear if it is the whole truth.

Ousmane Bah, 18, claims in a trial that he was mistakenly identified as a robber in several Apple Store thefts over several states, but denies that he is the person in the picture who followed the delay in his arrest. The background of surveillance films and testimonies of a detective, district attorneys in New York and Boston have already dropped the charges against Bah, the trial says. (He is still accused of larceny in New Jersey in an ongoing case, according to the document.)

According to the lawsuit, NYPD detective John Reinhold first noticed that Bah “did not look like” it suspected in the surveillance video of a Manhattan Apple Store being robbed. According to the trial, the detective then explained that Apple’s security technology identifies theft suspects using face detection technology.

When we arrived at Reinhold on the phone to comment, he agreed that Apple did not technically have facial recognition in their stores, but also that his statements described in the trial were accurate. He refused to answer further questions, but it is worth noting that the other defendant on the trial, the security industry’s specialists, could explain the contradiction &#821

1; it could have been the company that used facial recognition to analyze security film after the fact and possibly outside Apple’s facilities .

SIS Security does not explicitly mention Apple as a customer on its public website, but the third-party company appears to have a long-standing relationship with Apple, and a 2016 Employee Handbook on the site specifies Apple as a client.

The process says that Bah was presented with a police report claiming that a SIS preventative employee made him steal Apple Pencils on security video from a Boston Apple Store. Relying on Apple originally claimed that it did not have surveillance video, but eventually produced the images according to the trial.

Bah claims he could not have tried the Boston theft because he had participated in his senior president in Manhattan. At that time, however, speculating the real thief could have stolen his information from a learner’s state that he had previously lost – one that had not a photograph.

The trial is trying to justify the $ 1 billion claim by claiming that Apple and SIS caused damage to Bah through its illegal actions, including getting him arrested by the NYPD at his home in four in the morning and forcing him to miss school and a half-time exam, which then damages his grades. The suit claims that Apple was negligent, deliberately caused emotional distress and paralyzed and slandered Bah, including allegations.

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