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App Store scammers are using Touch ID tricks to steal money

Like their genuine counterparts, they promised to calculate your BMI, track daily calorie intake, or remind you to drink more…

Like their genuine counterparts, they promised to calculate your BMI, track daily calorie intake, or remind you to drink more water. Men de har også brukt en cunning trick, men rett og slett falsk, trick tied to to the iOS Touch ID sensor. Mens du spørger om at sikre dine personlige diætdata ved at scanne dit fingeraftryk, vil de apps vise et popup der viser en betaling på $ 1

19.99. With just seconds to act, the scam could easily see users inadvertently handing over money from their connected credit or debit cards.

It seems people reported the apps to Apple, which probably led to their removal, though Apple itself has not released an official statement on the takedowns. According to WeLiveSecurity the “Fitness Balance app” had an average rating of 4.3 stars, and received at least 18 mostly positive reviews, which may well have been faked.

In its developer guidelines, Apple forbids apps that “prey on users or attempt to rip off clients , trick dem til å lage uønskede kjøp, tvinger dem til å dele unødvendige data, forhøyer priser på en vanskelig måte, tar betalt for funksjoner eller innhold som ikke er levert, eller involverer andre manipulative rutiner innenfor eller utenfor appen. ” Developers who break the rules risk being banned forever, warns the company.

Despite Apple’s solid track record when it comes to App Store security, the odd shady app has slipped through the cracks. Late last year a fake port of the Xbox game Cuphead made the cut before being removed. And back in 2012, a fake version of the Game Boy classic Pokemon Yellow also appeared briefly on the App Store.

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Faela