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Antarctic scientist indicates a state of “psychological dormancy” – and it can help us get to Mars

Antarctic scientist states a state of "psychological dormancy" to cope with the stress of constant darkness, isolation and childbirth found…

Antarctic scientist states a state of “psychological dormancy” to cope with the stress of constant darkness, isolation and childbirth found by scientists.

The study can have important implications for manned trips to Mars and other planets where astronauts are likely to remain isolated for long periods,

Researchers studied workers at Concordia Station, where temperatures can drop to -80 ° C in the winter, and the sun does not rise over the horizon in winter and does not end in summer.

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 Researchers studied researchers at Concordia Station, where temperatures can drop to 80 ° C in the winter, and the sun does not rise over the horizon in winter and does not end in summer.

Researchers studied researchers at Concordia Station, where temperatures can drop to -80 ° C in winter, and the sun does not rise over the horizon in winter and does not end in summer.

Station workers in Antarctica reported a variety of problems, ranging from disturbed mood and anxiety to more serious psychiatric reactions.

These changes are especially pronounced during the midwinter period and have been reflected in symptoms called “winter-over syndrome”.

In the vast open landscape covered in darkness, colors, smells and sounds are almost non-existent and add to the feeling of loneliness.

Insulation and sensory depression can cause chaos on the crew member’s biological clock, making it difficult to have a good night’s sleep.

“Our results could reflect a form of psychological drowsiness,” said Dr. Nathan Smith, University of Manchester.

Previous research has suggested that this is a protective mechanism against chronic stress, which makes sense – if the conditions are uncontrollable, but you know that something in the future will make things better, you can choose to reduce coping efforts for to conserve energy. “

With the support of the European Space Agency, researchers from the University of Manchester, the University of Bergen in Nor Way and Tilburg University in the Netherlands, the change in sleep quality, emotions and management strategies examined for two winters in the harsh atmosphere of Concordia Station.

The area

CONCORDIA RESEARCH STATION

 Inside Concordia: After all, the difficulties of life in Antarctica, up to 16 people spend about one year in a time living in Concordia in the name of science.

Inre Concordia: Despite all the difficulties of life in Antarctica, up to 16 people spend around one year in a time that lives in Concordia in the name of science.

Concordia Research Station in Antar ktis is located on a plateau 3200 m above sea level.

Extremely, temperatures can fall to -80 ° C in the winter, with an annual average temperature of -50 ° C.

Since Concordia is at the southern tip of the Earth, the sun does not rise over the horizon in winter and does not end in summer.

The crew must live without sunlight for four months of the year.

Height and position mean that the air in Concordia is very thin and has less oxygen. Venturing outside the base requires you to put clothes of clothes and limit the time spent outdoors.

During the hard winter, no outside help can fly in or reach the base over land – the crew has to solve any problems on its own. [19659002] Concordia is also in the largest desert in the world. The air is extremely dry, so the crew is suffering from constantly cut lips and irritated eyes.

Concordia Research Station in the Moonlight

No animals can survive in this region – even bacteria have difficulty coping with extreme temperatures.

The nearest people are stationed about 600 km away on the Russian Vostok base, making Concordia far more remote than the International Space Station.

It is completely cut off in winter, the average temperature is -51 ° C, and the lowest recorded temperature is -85 ° C.

Because Concordia is located at the very south of the Earth tip does not rise the sun over the horizon in the winter and does not put in the summer.

The crew must be without sunlight for four months of the year.

By means of psychometric questionnaires, researchers asked the staff to report their sleep, emotional state and management strategies over the winter.

They found a pattern of deterioration of sleep quality and decreasing positive feelings that the winter developed, which then recovered when the sun returned.

 Halley VI The British Antarctic Survey Station Halley VI is based on Brown Ice Shelf, a floating ice-cream flowing from Antarctica plateau

Halley VIThe British Antarctic Survey Station Halley VI is based on the Brown Ice Shelf, a floating ice-cream flowing from the Antarctica plateau

But they also found that all the estimated management strategies fell in the winter months and returned after the dark winter phase had passed.

This surprised researchers, who believed that active coping efforts – as problem solving and comforting self-esteem – would decrease, and more passive coping efforts – such as denial and depressive responses – would increase in mid-winter when the staff were really cut off.

Antarctica studies have been considered comparable to spacecraft – so this research can also help to understand how to keep astronauts well under long space missions.

 Concordia Research Station in Antarctica is located on a plateau 3200 m above sea level, and. Extremely, temperatures can fall to 80 ° C in winter, with an annual average temperature of 50 ° C.

Concordia Research Station in Antarctica is located on a plateau that is 3200 m above sea level and. An outermost place, the temperature may drop to -80 ° C in the winter, with an annual average temperature of -50 ° C.

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