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Amazonian scary parasites transform spiders into zombie-like drones

Researchers exploring Ecuador's Amazon have discovered a new species of parasitic wasps that turn their victims into zombies. What scientists…

Researchers exploring Ecuador’s Amazon have discovered a new species of parasitic wasps that turn their victims into zombies.

What scientists say is a particular “hardcore” form of hijacking, these coats usually make social spiders their backs on their own colonies before spinning a cocoon for the larvae who will eventually eat it.

The cruel attack is manifested by most other known instances of warp parasitism, which is unusual because it is not aimed at a single spider species, which is usually the case.

 What the researchers say is a particular

What scientists say is a particular “hardcore” form of hijacking, these wasps usually make social spiders, turn their backs on their own colonies before spinning a cocoon for larvae that will ultimately eat it.

“Weapons who manipulate the spiders have been previously observed, but not as complicated as this,” said Philippe Fernandez-Fournier, principal author of the study and former doctoral student at UBC Department of Zoology.

“It’s not just this wasp that targets a spider’s social nature, but it leaves its colony, which rarely does.”

The parasitic wasp comes from the genus Zatypota and targets a spider called Anelosimus eximius – A unique social spider species known to live in large colonies and collaborates with others to catch change and raise their young.

During the investigation, the team discovered that some were infected with a parasitic larva and could be seen as wandering away from their colonies to spin closed roads.

“It was very odd because they usually do not, so I started taking notes,” said the researcher.

After bringing some of the so-called “cocoon webs” back to the lab to investigate, the researcher discovered that there were bulls inside.

“These beings are very elegant and graceful,” said Samantha Straus, co-author of the study and doctoral student of the OBC’s zoological institution.

But then they make the most brutal.

 The parasitic beep comes from genus Zatypota and targets a spider called Anelosimus eximius

 The cruel attack s lights out of most other known instances of warp parasitism, which is unusual because it is not aimed at a single spider species, as is usually the case.

The cruel attack is manifested by most other known instances of warp parasitism, which is unusual in that it is not aimed at a single spider species, as is usually the case.

According to researchers, the adult female wasp first puts an egg on a spider’s tummy.

Finally, the larva cuts and attaches to the spider’s body and ejects it as it grows.

In a zombie state, the spider leaves its colony and creates a cocoon for the larva. Then it is waiting to be killed and consumed.

The larva arrives at nine to eleven days later.

WHAT IS A PARASITOID?

Parasitoids are insects with parasitic larvae that eat their host – usually another insect – from the inside.

They often use a sharp tool called an ovipositor to deposit eggs under the skin or the exoskeleton of no detrimental hosts.

After a short period of pregnancy, the larvae cut and start consuming their host, which usually reaches the age of adult when the Värdan has died.

Parasitoid species are mostly types of bees, wasps and marshes, although some species of aviation use the cruel technology.

The biology of paroxids has inspired several science fiction writers and scriptwriters to create parasitoid aliens who kill human hosts, including the infamous Xenomorph in Ridley Scott’s 1979 film “Alien”.

 Parasitoids are insects with parasitic larvae that eat their host - usually another effort - from within. Depicted is a parasite soap that injects larvae into spiders and then sucks the host in its bow to pinch it.

Parasitoids are insects with parasitic larvae that eat their host – usually another insert – from the inside out. Depicted is a parasite soap that injects larvae into spiders and then sucks the host in its nest to clamp it.

& # 39; This behavior modification is so hardcore, & # 39; said Straus.

& # 39; The horse completely hijacks the behavior and brain of the spider and does it to do something it would never do, like leaving a living and spinning a completely different structure. It’s very dangerous for these little spiders. “

Scientists have not yet figured out how the wasps get the spiders to abandon their colonies, even if they suspect hormones are used, which may trick them into believing they are different. Lifestyle may be blaming.

” We think that the wasp targets those social spiders because it provides a large, stable host colony and food source, “Straus said.

” We also found that the larger spider colony, the more likely that these wasps would target it. “

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