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African swine fever poses a major threat to the Iowa pork industry

US. Agricultural workers announced Thursday steps to keep African swine fever, a highly contagious disease fatal to pigs, out of the country, as it could wipe out one of Iowa's most important exports. There have been 87 outbreaks of the disease in eight countries in Asia and Europe. Although African swine fever has not hit the United States, the agricultural secretary in Iowa, Mike Naig, said that the growing threat – besides the ongoing trade war with China – is having farmers even more concerned. "If you shut down all export markets, it would have an immediate impact on our producers and then a ripple effect on corn and soybean food suppliers to the industry," Naig said. Brigades of beagles are trained to control the cargo and sniff out infected pork products at ports and airports to get the disease to land. "We receive all kinds of feed ingredients from China," Naig said. "The virus can also be found in these products." Jamee Eggers, with the Iowa Pork Producers Association, said that if the disease hits US agriculture, the result would be "devastating", especially in Iowa where there are 23 million pigs. Eggers said the Iowa Pork Producers Association recommends farmers to take preventive measures by monitoring the disease, recognizing the early signs of the disease and spreading the news. African swine fever cannot harm people. U.S. The Department of Agriculture and Veterinarians are planning a state response. "You have to live in that world, expect it to happen and…

US. Agricultural workers announced Thursday steps to keep African swine fever, a highly contagious disease fatal to pigs, out of the country, as it could wipe out one of Iowa’s most important exports. There have been 87 outbreaks of the disease in eight countries in Asia and Europe. Although African swine fever has not hit the United States, the agricultural secretary in Iowa, Mike Naig, said that the growing threat – besides the ongoing trade war with China – is having farmers even more concerned. “If you shut down all export markets, it would have an immediate impact on our producers and then a ripple effect on corn and soybean food suppliers to the industry,” Naig said. Brigades of beagles are trained to control the cargo and sniff out infected pork products at ports and airports to get the disease to land. “We receive all kinds of feed ingredients from China,” Naig said. “The virus can also be found in these products.” Jamee Eggers, with the Iowa Pork Producers Association, said that if the disease hits US agriculture, the result would be “devastating”, especially in Iowa where there are 23 million pigs. Eggers said the Iowa Pork Producers Association recommends farmers to take preventive measures by monitoring the disease, recognizing the early signs of the disease and spreading the news. African swine fever cannot harm people. U.S. The Department of Agriculture and Veterinarians are planning a state response. “You have to live in that world, expect it to happen and be vigilant,” Naig said. Researchers work to develop a vaccine against African swine fever. One study estimates that if the disease enters the United States, it could cost the economy more than $ 1

6 billion.
DES MOINES, Iowa (KCCI) –

U.S. Agricultural workers announced Thursday steps to keep African swine fever, a highly contagious disease fatal to pigs, out of the country, as it could wipe out one of Iowa’s most important exports.

There have been 87 outbreaks of the disease in eight countries in Asia and Europe. Although African swine fever has not hit the United States, the agricultural secretary of Iowa, Mike Naig, said that the growing threat – besides the ongoing trade war with China – is having farmers even more concerned.

“If you shut down every export market, which would have an immediate impact on our producers and then a ripple effect for corn and soybean, which are food suppliers to the industry,” Naig said.

Brigades of beagles are trained to control the cargo and sniff the infected pork products at ports and airports to get the disease to land.

“We get all kinds of feed ingredients from China,” said Naig. “The virus can also be found in these products.”

Jamee Eggers, with the Iowa Pork Producers Association, said that if the disease hits American agriculture, the result would be “devastating” especially in Iowa, where there are 23 million pigs.

Eggers said the Iowa Pork Producers Association recommends farmers to take preventive measures by monitoring the disease, recognizing the early signs of the disease and spreading the news.

African swine fever cannot harm people. U.S. The Department of Agriculture and Veterinarians are planning a state response.

“You must live in that world and expect it to happen and be vigilant,” Naig said.

Researchers work to develop a vaccine against African swine fever. One study estimates that if the disease enters the United States, it could cost the economy more than $ 16 billion.

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