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A New York City student with measles sick 21 people in the midst of an outbreak

March 8, 2019 Health 0 Views Breaking News Emails Get urgent news alerts and special reports. March 8, 2019, 18:59 UTC By Elisha Fieldstadt A student who contracted measles has infected 21 other people with ties to a Jewish school in New York City, according to health officials. The incident comes as a result of an abuse of measles in Brooklyn, which has injured more than 1 00 people. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene says 133 cases of measles have been reported since the outbreak began in October. The majority of the infected people live in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Borough Park and Williamsburg. The first case reported was a child who was unvaccinated and contracted measles while traveling to Israel, according to the health ward. In December, the Ministry of Health issued a mandatory directive that schools in selected postal codes in Borough Park and Williamsburg exclude students who did not receive measles rubella vaccine (MMR). But Yeshiva Kehilath Yakov in Williamsburg "went out of conformity" and allowed an unvaccinated student with measles to go to school, according to the health department. 21 out of 87 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg "are linked to" the school, said the health department. Yeshiva Kehilath Yakov is now working on the Health Department to prevent further exposures, says health care spokesman Michael Lanza to NBC News Friday. "The rise of measles cases in orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn shows the importance of having children vaccinated on time to…

Breaking News Emails

Get urgent news alerts and special reports.

By Elisha Fieldstadt

A student who contracted measles has infected 21 other people with ties to a Jewish school in New York City, according to health officials. The incident comes as a result of an abuse of measles in Brooklyn, which has injured more than 1

00 people.

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene says 133 cases of measles have been reported since the outbreak began in October.

The majority of the infected people live in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Borough Park and Williamsburg.

The first case reported was a child who was unvaccinated and contracted measles while traveling to Israel, according to the health ward.

In December, the Ministry of Health issued a mandatory directive that schools in selected postal codes in Borough Park and Williamsburg exclude students who did not receive measles rubella vaccine (MMR).

But Yeshiva Kehilath Yakov in Williamsburg “went out of conformity” and allowed an unvaccinated student with measles to go to school, according to the health department.

21 out of 87 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg “are linked to” the school, said the health department. Yeshiva Kehilath Yakov is now working on the Health Department to prevent further exposures, says health care spokesman Michael Lanza to NBC News Friday.

“The rise of measles cases in orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn shows the importance of having children vaccinated on time to prevent measles and not putting other children at risk,” said functioning health commissioner Dr Oxiris Barbot in a statement.

The health department has spread the word about the MMR vaccine in Orthodox Jewish communities by reaching out to healthcare providers and schools, putting advertisements in newspapers and distributing literature, the department said.

“There has been an increase in vaccination rates in these communities since the health department announced the outbreak, but many more children are to get the MMR vaccine to stop measles transmission,” according to the department.

Debates in the Orthodox Jewish community over vaccinations derived from the Torah teaches us that followers must not harm the body because it is a gift from God.

Some see the small risks associated with vaccines and the risk of suffering “which has been largely eliminated” equally and so subscribe to the Talmudic poems that translate into “in some cases of doubt, better to sit and do nothing “, according to Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin, Chabad.org’s Content Editor.

But some New York rabbis call parents to act and get their vaccinated children.

“It says in the Torah” Vishmartem Meod Leanafshoseichem “that a person must guard their health,” said Rabbi David Niederman in northern Brooklyn, according to a health department declaration.

It is very clear that the parents need to make sure their children are vaccinated, especially from Measles, he says.

Rabbi Avi Greenstein, executive director of Boro Park’s Jewish Community Council said that we must remove the lesson from the importance of each of us utilizing modern medicine and not relying on the immune system but rather following the vaccination schedule recommended by healthcare professionals to protect our families and our entire society. “

fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes and rash and with complications can cause swelling of the brain and death, according to the New York City Department of Health. The virus is highly contagious and thus remains on surfaces for two hours. Symptoms usually do not occur until 10-12 days after a person is exposed.

The outbreak in New York has not led to any deaths, but 10 people have been hospitalized, including one who was in intensive care but has

On the other hand The country has 71 cases verified in Clark County, Washington.

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