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9/11 is over taliban talks and insurance militant group has changed

Despite years of fighting, only about 65 percent of the Afghan people live in areas under government control. To reflect the feeling they have overall on the battlefield, or at least a deadlock, the Taliban is keen to show that it is no longer for international terrorist groups. It also tries to portray itself as ready to enter the official hall of power. So the militant group expects war crimes to contemplate the United States fear of the 20 or so "trans-regional" terrorist groups believed to be active in and around Afghanistan. A leading Afghan Taliban commander, who is also a member of the group's leadership council, told NBC News that there were around 2,000 to 3,000 non-Afghan soldiers in the Middle East, mainly from China, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Chechnya, Tunisia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Iraq. "We are Muslims and according to our religion, we can not deny protection against anyone if he or she is in trouble" said the master recently participated in three days of Khalilzad conversation in Qatar. "None of the foreign militants would be allowed to raise weapons and use this earth against any country in the world." Thousands of Pakistanis are also considered to be fighting as members of the Taliban. Bin Laden also attracted foreign warriors to Afghanistan after moving there when the country was ruled by the Taliban, so the issue of how the group would handle the issue still argues in Washington. Osama bin Laden took refuge in Afghanistan before September 11, 2001,…

Despite years of fighting, only about 65 percent of the Afghan people live in areas under government control.

To reflect the feeling they have overall on the battlefield, or at least a deadlock, the Taliban is keen to show that it is no longer for international terrorist groups. It also tries to portray itself as ready to enter the official hall of power.

So the militant group expects war crimes to contemplate the United States fear of the 20 or so “trans-regional” terrorist groups believed to be active in and around Afghanistan.

A leading Afghan Taliban commander, who is also a member of the group’s leadership council, told NBC News that there were around 2,000 to 3,000 non-Afghan soldiers in the Middle East, mainly from China, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Chechnya, Tunisia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

“We are Muslims and according to our religion, we can not deny protection against anyone if he or she is in trouble” said the master recently participated in three days of Khalilzad conversation in Qatar. “None of the foreign militants would be allowed to raise weapons and use this earth against any country in the world.”

Thousands of Pakistanis are also considered to be fighting as members of the Taliban.

Bin Laden also attracted foreign warriors to Afghanistan after moving there when the country was ruled by the Taliban, so the issue of how the group would handle the issue still argues in Washington.

Osama bin Laden took refuge in Afghanistan before September 11, 2001, attacks. AFP File

Ahmed Rashid, considered one of the world’s leading authorities in the Taliban and Afghanistan, estimated that between 2000 and 3000 Arabs under bin Laden fought with the Taliban before 9/11, like tens of thousands of Pakistani militants and a smaller number of Uzbek radicals. The number of foreign warriors in Afghanistan in the 1980s was around 35,000, according to Rashid.

Despite 17 years of anti-terrorism in Afghanistan, a heavily weakened al-Qaeda is still working in pockets in the country. In August, Afghan Defense Trustees said that its militants had been part of a Taliban abuse in the eastern part of the country. And in November, an American soldier was killed in violation of all Qaida militants in the southwest.

“Even after 9/11, the Taliban were not willing to give up Al Qaeda,” said Vanda Felbab-Brown, an expert on international terrorism and a leading man at Brookings Institution, a Washington-based tanker. “Although the Taliban from the 2000’s periodically told the US that they would not support Al Qaeda, they have never been willing to say publicly to the record.”

It would be politically expensive to “just refrain from their brothers,” she said.

This is partly due to the fact that after the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in 1979, the country became a magnet for cash and a training venue for thousands of jihadians. Bin Laden collected money to help execute “unfaithful” Russian troops in a cause that galvanized a generation of Mujajah or holy warriors and still reverberates throughout the Muslim world.

“I do not think the Taliban loves Al Qaeda, says Felbab-Brown.” But that does not necessarily mean that they can easily control them. “

Mujahedeen is sitting on a prison soviet tank in Afghanistan in 1987. AP fil

Although they wanted it, it is unlikely that the Taliban could hold a promise to force foreign fighters and groups. For one thing, the Kabul government has always struggled to control the country.

And then ISIS Khorasan, The Islamic State’s local affiliate, which contains many abusive Taliban supporters. While small in number, the group has been particularly brazen and mortal.

Other groups of regional ambitions, such as Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammed – both fighting for Indian controlled cashmere to differ from and become part of Pakistan – has driven “independently, or even in opposition to the Taliban,” says Felbab-Brown.

The Taliban expects that during the 17 years as it has fought US and Afghan forces not a single attack outside the country has originated from Afghanistan.

Today’s Taliban is much more self-sufficient, according to Seth Jones, a former Special Operator in Afghanistan and the Director of the Transnational Threat Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, thinking of Washington’s thought.

The Taliban could count on an influx of financial aid and warriors from abroad, especially from the Conservative Sunnic Gulf,

when they gave shelter to bin Laden before 9/11. The group has diversified its income and is involved in everything from poppy – the source of opium – to the woodworking company, Jones said.

“Local Taliban Commandants are quite innovative to find income sources [and] taxation in areas,” he said. “I’m not worried that the Taliban can find money.”

Of particular interest is continued support for the Taliban from neighboring Pakistan, which has long been supporting the group. Frustration with this caused Trump to cancel $ 300 million in aid to Pakistan in September.

Pakistani officials reject statements that they help or protect Afghan militants.

Experts also say it seems doubtful that the Taliban could ever fully control the country. This opens the possibility that groups like ISIS, as the Taliban have fought, will set fortresses and terrorists’ intention to attack targets beyond Afghanistan’s borders.

“The challenge is that the luran and magnetism in Iraq and Syria has dropped war,” Jones said, referring to the readmission of most of the country in the Middle East, once controlled by ISIS.

And as the source of “global jihad”, Afghanistan is still “a winning thing,” he added.

Associated Press and Reuters contributed.

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