Categories: world

5 new music versions we love

Charly Bliss Photo: Ebru Yildiz There is a lot of music out there. To help you cut through all the sounds, every week A.V. Club rounds up A-Pages five latest releases we think are worth your time. You can listen to these and much more on Spotify. [Barsuk, May 1 0] Charly Bliss turned Indian Indians with the 2017s Guppy a sophisticated record of sugary power pop that flourished during the power plant's charisma by singer Eva Hendricks. The distortion is dialed on Brooklyn's four-legged latest edition, Young Enough but the intensity that made Guppy so important is still burning under these candy-colored synths and bouncing, Jepsen-esque choirs. So, Hendrick's smart, striking word game, which in the miscarriage of an abusive relationship finds an urgent mix of painful intimacy ("Hurt Me", "Young Enough") and exuberant liberation ("Chatroom", "Hard to Believe"), for not to mention the too common question that accompanies the loss of a troubled partner: Can I have saved them? Young Enough sounds cleaner than before – producer Joe Chiccarelli has worked with everyone from Oingo Boingo to Broken Social Scene – but the lyrical complexity of Charly Bliss's early work remains, as well as its burning, palpitating energy. [Randall Colburn] [Jagjaguwar, May 10] It was not enough for Jamila Woods to simply follow up on her 2016 debut album, Heavn who acted as self-reflection on her identity. With Legacy! Legacy !, raises the Chicago poet and trainer's voice as she navigates black and black feminism through the lessons…

Charly Bliss Photo: Ebru Yildiz

There is a lot of music out there. To help you cut through all the sounds, every week A.V. Club rounds up A-Pages five latest releases we think are worth your time. You can listen to these and much more on Spotify.


[Barsuk, May 1

0]

Charly Bliss turned Indian Indians with the 2017s Guppy a sophisticated record of sugary power pop that flourished during the power plant’s charisma by singer Eva Hendricks. The distortion is dialed on Brooklyn’s four-legged latest edition, Young Enough but the intensity that made Guppy so important is still burning under these candy-colored synths and bouncing, Jepsen-esque choirs. So, Hendrick’s smart, striking word game, which in the miscarriage of an abusive relationship finds an urgent mix of painful intimacy (“Hurt Me”, “Young Enough”) and exuberant liberation (“Chatroom”, “Hard to Believe”), for not to mention the too common question that accompanies the loss of a troubled partner: Can I have saved them? Young Enough sounds cleaner than before – producer Joe Chiccarelli has worked with everyone from Oingo Boingo to Broken Social Scene – but the lyrical complexity of Charly Bliss’s early work remains, as well as its burning, palpitating energy. [Randall Colburn]


[Jagjaguwar, May 10]

It was not enough for Jamila Woods to simply follow up on her 2016 debut album, Heavn who acted as self-reflection on her identity. With Legacy! Legacy !, raises the Chicago poet and trainer’s voice as she navigates black and black feminism through the lessons of the greatest pillar of culture. Moved by characters like Nikki Giovanni, Octavia Butler and Betty Shabazz, to name just a few, Woods reclaims a legacy that has been watered and repackaged. Legacy! Heritage! explores flawlessly the community while serving as his own: Woods chopped plenty of space for partners to spread their own perspective. “Basquiat”, a simmering, cathartic ode to the neo-expressionist artist of the same name, presents the acerbic flow of fellow Chicago rapper Saba as they call the blackening of black feelings, namely anger. Managing to find an ideal, symbiotic relationship between hip hop, soul, jazz and R&B, Woods has created a sophomore knockout that doubles as a protection vessel around black humanity. [Shannon Miller]


[Southern Lord, May 10]

“Dinosaur” is a word that runs in mind while listening to the huge racket of Big Brave. The Montreal trio launches large, diverting cannons of space and then stompes its way from one end to the other. A lightning signal the fourth LP of the brake, does not break much from the attack plan for its predecessor, the deadly good of 2017 Ardor : There are five tracks here instead of three but most decide on a similar track , progressively higher and heavier, like the occurrence of prehistoric footprints. “Hold patterns” escalate most cathartically, building from a minimalist drone to a full blown stampede. But for as often as Gaze s fuzzy rifle spikes into red, the album is melodic as well as titanic, and its avalanche of sound never drowns out the human dimension – the boring feeling of the opening track, for example, culminating in frontwoman Robin Wattie bellowing “Don’t make it” over violently crashing guitars. The final thirst of burnout distortion seems a bit like a heartbeat. Godzilla, but still. [A.A. Dowd]


We collect our A-Sides recommendations on a Spotify playlist updated every Friday. Subscribe and subscribe here .


Holly Herndon, Proto

[4AD, May 10]

Rinse on pop culture images of rogue machines, but we usually show artificial intelligence, as everyone unknown, with fear. “It’s one of AI’s biggest problems; it’s this type of opaque black boxing technology,” Holly Herndon recently told The Muse . Therefore, the avant-pop composer aims at the third LP Proto to capture the technology’s creation and collaboration potential – to reveal their highly human, rudimentary inner effects. To achieve this, Herndon trained primarily her “AI baby,” Spawn, on our most primary instrument: the voice. Proto is saturated with arrangements inspired by religious gatherings and municipal song traditions; they call Appalachian and Bulgarian song (“Frontier”, “Canaan”), among others, but also feel new and emphasize the universality of these methods. It is inevitably a lot of process for Proto but Herndon makes it a lot of fun to witness, both in exploratory moments as “Godmother” and poppies as “Eternal” with their arched harmonies and heavy blows. Overall, there is further evidence that even in electronic most progressive spheres, Herndon dares to go where few others come. [Kelsey J. Waite]


[Ernest Jenning Record Co., May 3]

Ex Nihilo the first Versus edition since 2010’s fantastic LP On The Threes finds the band in a reflective mood. The title Ex Nihilo literally means “out of nothing” and this EP addresses the elliptical creation and divinity with equal shares of doubt and faith. “Invisible love” exhibits the hallmarks of the classic Versus sound, a deeply inspiring halcyon day of the 90’s indie rock, which played a major role in defining dirty-winding guitars that crash with ruthless abandon as guitarist singer Richard Baluyut and bassist – Singing Fontaine Toup’s song was blended together. “Gravity (Version)” is the record’s emotional peak, a dub / funk cousin of Wire’s “Used To,” fatally serious as Baluyut thinks of “What is left when the spirit is gone?” This engagement is never reconciled, but to paraphrase from Milan Customers’ The unbearable brightness to be the only really serious issues are those without answers. Versus analyzing such ontological problems with childish miracles throughout Ex Nihilo which suggests that what comes after our spirits leave our bodies will be a beautiful surprise, even if it is not something. [John Everhart]

Share
Published by
Faela