Categories: world

& # 39; Farout & # 39 ;: Most Remote Known Objects in Sun Detected Systems

Artist's perception of 2018 VG18, which has been called "Farout" by astronomers. The sun is displayed in the background. (Roberto Molar Candanosa / Carnegie Department of Science) Object 201 8 VG18 was discovered November 10th with the Japanese Subaru 8 meter telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The size of the object suggests that it may be a dwarf plan. The most distant known object in our solar system was discovered recently by astronomers. Scientists with the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center announced the discovery of the object dubbed "Farout" on Monday. Object 2018 VG18 first observed on November 10 by Carnegie Institute of Science Scott S. Sheppard, University of Hawaii David Tholen and Northern Arizona University Chad Trujillo with the Japanese Subaru 8 meter telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. A second observation in early December via the Magellan telescope at Las Campana's observatory in Chile offered astronomers more information about the object that is over three and a half times further away from the sun than the solar system's most famous [2016500] Object 2018 VG18, which is seen by the Subaru telescope on November 10, 2018. (Scott S. Sheppard and David Tholen / Carnegie Institute of Science) While large enough to be a possible dwarf planet, astronomers do not believe the object is large enough to be Planet X – once called Planet Nine – a suspected ninth planet in the solar system, according to the press release. [MORE: Researchers Assessed by the Mysterious Plan's Powerful Magnetic…

Artist’s perception of 2018 VG18, which has been called “Farout” by astronomers. The sun is displayed in the background.

(Roberto Molar Candanosa / Carnegie Department of Science
)

  • Object 201

    8 VG18 was discovered November 10th with the Japanese Subaru 8 meter telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  • The size of the object suggests that it may be a dwarf plan.

The most distant known object in our solar system was discovered recently by astronomers.

Scientists with the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center announced the discovery of the object dubbed “Farout” on Monday.

Object 2018 VG18 first observed on November 10 by Carnegie Institute of Science Scott S. Sheppard, University of Hawaii David Tholen and Northern Arizona University Chad Trujillo with the Japanese Subaru 8 meter telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

A second observation in early December via the Magellan telescope at Las Campana’s observatory in Chile offered astronomers more information about the object that is over three and a half times further away from the sun than the solar system’s most famous [2016500] Object 2018 VG18, which is seen by the Subaru telescope on November 10, 2018.

(Scott S. Sheppard and David Tholen / Carnegie Institute of Science)

While large enough to be a possible dwarf planet, astronomers do not believe the object is large enough to be Planet X – once called Planet Nine – a suspected ninth planet in the solar system, according to the press release.

[MORE: Researchers Assessed by the Mysterious Plan’s Powerful Magnetic Field )

The object is so far away that astronomers say a trip around the sun 2018, VG18 can take up to 1000 years of Earth , but it may take some time before it is definitely decided.

“Because the 2018 VG18 is so distant, it cycles very slowly, it probably takes more than 1000 years to take a trip around the sun,” said Tholan in the press release.

The object appears to be pink in color and about 310 to 372 miles in diameter, notes the astronomers.

“This would make it a dwarf plan. The color of the object is pink in red color, indicating that it has an oily surface,” said Sheppard Gizmodo. “Ice is usually reddish after being irradiated for long periods of sunshine.”

The astronomers team says the discovery can help researchers understand what’s happening in the outer reach of the solar system.

“This discovery is truly an international achievement in research on telescopes in Hawaii and Chile, run by Japan, as well as a consortium of research institutes and universities in the United States,” concluded Trujillo. “With new digital digital cameras on some of the world’s largest telescope, we finally investigate our solar system’s fringes, far beyond Pluto. “

Share
Published by
Faela